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Today's News

  • Election: Five Democrats trying to replace outgoing treasurer

    Kentucky Democrats will have plenty of options when they go to the polls May 19 to select their nominees.
    Treasurer Todd Hollenbach is in the final year of his second term in office, so he is ineligible for re-election.
    Neville Blakemore of Louisville, Jim Glenn of Owensboro, Daniel B. Grossberg of Louisville, Richard Henderson of Mt. Sterling and Rick Nelson of Middlesboro are seeking to succeed Hollenbach.

  • Relay for Life is June 12

    The 19th annual American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event is fast approaching. This year's Relay for Life event in Marion County is scheduled for Friday, June 12. The event will be returning to the upper baseball fields at Graham Memorial Park off of Park View Drive in Lebanon.
    This year’s event will be different, however. It will begin at 6 p.m. and end at 1 a.m. According to Relay for Life committee members, many people have been unable to participate in an all-night event, so this should be a welcome change.

  • Celebrating all things handmade

    The third annual Maker’s Mark Handcraft Festival took place Saturday at the distillery in Loretto. The festival celebrates all things handmade, and 27 vendors from across the country were on hand to share their handcrafted items with the public. The festival was free, and also included handcrafted food and cocktails, music and a self-guided tour of the distillery. The distillery was expecting 5,000 people to attend the festival, which is held annually on the second Saturday in April.
     

  • Rescued at sea

    Lebanon residents Bill Durham and Barbara May returned from a recent cruise in the Caribbean with some rather interesting souvenirs.
    While at sea on March 2, headed toward Jamaica, they witnessed a sea rescue of eight Cuban men, and they have the photos to prove it.
    “We were at sea, and all of a sudden the ship stopped,” Durham told the Enterprise recently. “We wondered what was going on, so we looked over the balcony and saw some of the crew from the ship rescuing these guys.”

  • A Day for Writers

    The Friends of the Library hosted Authors Day at the Marion County Public Library for writers with local ties to meet readers and sell a few books. A portion of the proceeds from those sales went to the Friends.

  • 25-year-old dies in accident on Miller Pike

     A 25-year-old man from Raywick died Sunday evening as a result of a single-vehicle accident on Miller Pike.

  • Horns of Plenty

    Members of the Kentucky Baroque Trumpets performed a concert Saturday evening before a small but committed group of listeners April 11 at St. Augustine Church. John Foster, an internationally renowned musician from Australia, performed with the group, along with music students from the University of Kentucky. The Kentucky Baroque Trumpets are preparing to perform May 1-3 in Springfield, Illinois, as part of the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's funeral.

  • Distracted driving: 'It's the new drunk driving'

    By Judah Taylor
    Landmark News Service

    While seizing the first taste of spring behind his motorcycle’s handlebars, Kevin Fields says he was nearly side-swiped by a woman who wasn’t paying attention to him or the road and was only focusing on the make-up she was applying.
    Though Fields, 49, has been riding since he was 5, he sold his bike that day.
    “It just aggravated me so much,” he said. “And I just decided I’m going to quit riding for a few years.”

  • Heart attack: The top killer of people at work in Kentucky

    Kentucky Press News Service

    In keeping with its mission to protect workers in the state, the Kentucky Labor Cabinet examined the causes of worker fatalities each year in Kentucky from 2012-14, and found the heart attack was the overwhelming No. 1 cause of death at work.

  • Anti-drug czar: 'Every life is worth saving'

    By Terry DeMio
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    COVINGTON – The stigma of drug addiction, the stigma of using medicine to treat it, the stigma of needle exchange and the idea that a life-saving drug shouldn't be used for overdose victims all need to end.
    Michael Botticelli, the director of White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, delivered these messages when he visited Northern Kentucky on April 9.