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Today's News

  • Concrete support for cancer research

    If you thought you saw a cement truck with a big pink ribbon painted on it recently, you weren't hallucinating.

    Marion County Concrete has painted the ribbon on one of its trucks to convey a simple message: "Find a Cure."

    Jeremy Hodges, the owner and operator of Marion County Concrete, said they decided to paint the truck in memory of his mother-in-law, who died after being diagnosed with breast cancer a few years ago. He thought about how close his family was with his mother-in-law and with Relay for Life coming up, it seemed like a good time to do it.

  • Open for debate

    The Marion County Board of Education and Superintendent Donald Smith speak often about their desire to be "transparent."

    However, a discussion that took place last week during an executive session would seem to contradict that. That discussion, which involved a redistricting issue that could potentially affect an entire neighborhood, should have taken place in open session. But, instead, it was discussed behind closed doors.

  • Little Sluggers

    Nearly 50 campers received instruction from the Marion County High School baseball staff and team last week during the 13th annual MCHS baseball camp.    

    Twenty-six campers from ages nine through 12 and 21 campers from ages six through eight learned how to field, play catch, run the bases and other fundamentals at Dave Hourigan Field.

  • In Brief

    Original name restored to cemetery

    Andrew Grundy appeared before the Lebanon City Council June 7 with one request - to rename Al Bilik Park to its original name.

    The park, which is located on North Proctor Knott Avenue, was originally the First Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

    Grundy explained that the first settlers in Marion County were Presbyterians, and the cemetery was the burial site for many of the early settlers who founded Lebanon as a community.

  • Happy and healthy

    Amber Fields' life changed March 8, 2007.

    She was 26 years old at the time. After dealing with constant pain for about a week, she decided to have her doctor check it out.

    "I went to the doctor with some pain and ended up a week later going under the knife," she said. "They removed a volleyball-sized tumor from my left ovary."

    Fields, now 29, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The tumor that the surgeon removed weighed more than three pounds.

  • Adam Hughes Memorial Highway has been dedicated

    The Lebanon bypass extension was dedicated Tuesday morning, June 15. As part of the dedication of the extension, that portion of Hwy. 2154 has been named the Adam Hughes Memorial Highway.

    Sgt. Hughes died while serving in Iraq when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle.

    Look for more about the dedication in the June 23 print edition.

  • Try pineapple pork loins and pepper muffins

    I meant to put this recipe in my column last winter, but I never got around to it. It's good any time of the year, though. You can buy the pork loin slices already cut, but I like to get a whole pork loin and cut the slices kind of thick. It's really yummy. You can fix just about anything to go with it, but rice is nice.

  • Track awards announced

    The Marion County High School track team recently announced their end of season award winners.

    The season MVP, which is based on the athlete with the most points earned at meets through the year, went to Bryson Bell and Natavia Young.

    The Most Improved Awards went to Brooks Devine and Tamyra McElroy.

    The Hurdles Award went to Timmy Dawson and Jassmine Franklin.

    The Throws Award went to Tamyra McElroy and Dylan Caldwell.

    Earning the Jumps Award were Natavia Young and Kendal Taul.

  • What's in the water?

    Customers of Lebanon Water Works and the Marion County Water District recently received a report stating that in February a water sample had a turbidity level that exceeded the turbidity standards.   So what is turbidity?

    "Turbidity is not harmful to your health," said John L. Thomas, Lebanon Water Works superintendent. "It's just the cloudiness of the water. I doubt that anybody saw it at their household."

  • MCHS band in dire situation, but so are academics, principal says

    In April, during a discussion about Section 7 requests, board members agreed to possibly give the Marion County High School band $10,000. The board didn't make an official decision on that funding, however.

    According to Marion County High School Principal Taylora Schlosser, the board asked the MCHS site-based decision-making council to make the recommendation for the band to receive those funds. However, the council was uncomfortable doing so, and voiced their concerns during last week's board meeting.