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Today's News

  • Bill would require insurance companies to offer sinkhole insurance

    By Katie Brandenburg
    Bowling Green Daily News

    A legislator has filed legislation that would require more insurers to offer coverage for sinkhole damage.
    Rep. Jody Richards, D-Bowling Green, has filed House Bill 498 that would require insurers who offer property insurance to offer an additional policy rider covering sinkhole damage for an additional premium.
    Richards filed the legislation Feb. 27.

  • Biding his time

    March 11 will mark the 15-year anniversary of when Aaron Glasscock woke up to Drug Enforcement Administration agents storming into his hotel room in Gainesville, Fla., and arresting him for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.
    At that very moment, Aaron’s life, and the life of his family, was forever changed.
    “When the D.E.A. agents came in that morning everything I thought I knew, and my life in general, was turned upside down, and then shook,” Aaron wrote in a letter.

  • Strong: ‘A mighty man of God’

    “Be strong and courageous.” (Joshua 1:9)
    Tanner Strong etched those words on the cover of his Bible with a pocketknife. If he were here today, that’s undoubtedly the advice he would give to his father, family and friends who are grieving his death.
    “He was a mighty man of God,” Joe Strong said about his 16-year-old son.
    Jeffrey Tanner Strong died Feb. 19 when he and a friend were tearing down a tree house.

  • Honoring Tanner Strong

    On Tuesday, Feb 26, Marion County High School held a memorial for Jeffrey Tanner Strong. Strong, who died in an accident last week, was remembered by his church, family and peers from MCHS. After students read their memories about Strong, they walked a lap around the track and had a balloon release.

    See more photos in next week's edition of The Lebanon Enterprise.
     

  • Bluegrass Pipeline to be delayed a year

    By Ryan Quinn
    The State Journal

    The Feb. 19 announcement that the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline will be delayed a year is a victory in “round one” for Kentuckians, a leading opponent to the project said.
    Chris Schimmoeller, president of Envision Franklin County, said the company’s decision gives respite to landowners.
    “I look forward to solving some of these issues without the pipeline breathing down our necks,” Schimmoeller said.

  • House destroyed but no injuries in Clell Mattingly Road house fire

     Firefighters from Loretto, Raywick and Lebanon responded to a house fire Feb. 25 at 1020 Clell Mattingly Road.

    J.C. “Tooders” Mattingly, 83, was at home during the fire, but got out with the help of David Ray Hardesty.

    “I had no idea it was happening,” Mattingly said.

    While he got out unharmed, Mattingly’s house was pretty well destroyed. He said he’d lived there his entire life.

  • Honoring the past

    Sunday was a day to honor and remember black history in Marion County.
    Hundreds of people attended the local NAACP’s annual celebration at Centre Square, and then visited the Marion County Heritage Center for the grand opening of its new black history exhibit.
    “This is a great achievement,” said Ann Simpson, treasurer of the local NAACP chapter. “I think it’ll be more prosperous as it goes along.”

  • Beefy operation

    Unlike many recipients of the Marion County Chamber of Commerce’s Outstanding Awards, Pat Hourigan wasn’t surprised to hear his name called at the chamber dinner.
    Hourigan wasn’t being vain, however.
    “They pretty much had to tell me to get me to show up,” he said.
    Hourigan, 52, grew up in Gravel Switch. He was the youngest of Ross and Betty Hourigan’s three children.

  • History on display

    Adam Poff has been impressed with the work done by the Marion County Historical Society to transform the old courthouse into the Marion County Heritage Center.
    “It has become a fixture in the community in such a short period of time,” Poff said.
    And as the outgoing president of the Marion County Chamber of Commerce, he selected the heritage center to receive this year’s President’s Award.
    Most people probably know that the center is the home of the Turtleman Museum, but there’s more to it than that.

  • Taylor County woman still going strong at 106

    She still remembers the first time she rode in a car. And she can recall her first airplane ride. But she doesn't seem to understand why there is such a fuss about her 106th birthday.
    On Feb. 16, Frances Moss celebrated 106 years of life. Performers from Kentucky Classic Theater came to The Grandview Nursing and Rehabilitation Facility, where Moss now lives, to perform songs from her lifetime in her honor.
    "It was so much more than I thought it was going to be," she said.