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Today's News

  • Lebanon June Jam

    Crowds gathered to enjoy the Lebanon June Jam Friday. There were musicians, rappers and a speaker for the event. The show started with Josh Poynter who played two songs before introducing the rapper Chrys Jones. Jones rapped with intensity and spoke about his life in between songs. The band, 3:30, headlined the evening, offering praise and worship songs. During an intermission, Janice Baker spoke for a few minutes about her life and challenged the crowd to better themselves before 3:30 came out to finish the show.

  • Find something to be glad about

    Excuse me, but I’m about to channel my inner “Pollyanna.”
    For those of you who aren’t familiar with Pollyanna, let me explain.
    In the best-selling novel, Pollyanna, a young orphan, has been taught by her father how to play "the glad game," in which the goal is to "find something about everything to be glad about.”
    I’ve been trying to do this more often in my own life.
    Sometimes it’s difficult, or darn near impossible, but I still try.

  • Next time, take a cab

    I thought I was being smart when I slipped my wallet into my front pocket. I remember the smirk on my face when my wife, Emily, told me I should put it in the suitcase because it was all the money we had for this trip.
    “I’ll be fine,” I told her, patting the front of my jeans. A pickpocket would never go for the front one. It would be too easy for me to catch them.

  • HR 1942 and what it means

    By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    Safeguard American Food Exports Act of 2016, HR 1942, was referred to committee in late April and is currently still there.
    This bill would make the sale or transport of horses and other equines for the purpose of consumption illegal. It would also label them as not domesticated for human consumption.
    Most of you are probably wide-eyed with your jaws on the floor right now. Horse slaughter in the U.S., who knew?

  • Celebrate freedom, remember our Founding Fathers

    As it has for nearly two-and-a-half centuries, our nation will pause on Monday to celebrate its “birth” day, commemorating a time 240 years ago when the Founding Fathers declared our independence.
    Since July 4, 1776, we have weathered a war for our freedom, a war against ourselves, and wars against those who would like nothing more than to see us and our values falter. Although the world has changed in countless ways since Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence, our commitment to protect and promote freedom has never wavered.

  • Take pride in our foundation of freedom

    The Fourth of July gives us all a chance to reflect on our country and to take pride in our nation's enduring principles. It is the day on which the Declaration of Independence was ratified by exemplary visionaries who dared to create a new form of government and new laws for a new people. For the first time it was decided that every person is born with certain God-given rights and that government should have no powers of its own other than those granted to it by the people.  

  • Maker’s Mark makeover

    Eric Henn, an internationally-known muralist, painted a Maker’s Mark whiskey bottle on the City of Lebanon’s water tower, signifying Marion County as the home of Maker’s Mark Distillery, the county’s No. 1 tourist attraction. After delays due to poor weather conditions, the project is now complete.
     

  • Interim principal hired for MCHS

    Marion County High School will be led by Interim Principal Tom Brown during the 2016-17 school year.
    The MCHS Principal Selection Committee selected Brown to serve as the interim principal and Marion County Superintendent Taylora Schlosser made the announcement Thursday evening.
    “Mr. Brown is a 27-year retired teacher and administrator with various experiences as a teacher, coach and principal,” Schlosser wrote in an email to the Enterprise.

  • Kentucky ponders use of private prisons

    By Morgan Watkins
    The Courier-Journal

    As Kentucky’s prison population rises and county jails become overcrowded, the state may reopen a pair of private prisons to temporarily take in more than 1,600 inmates.
    The state stopped housing inmates in private prisons in 2013, but there has been unexpected growth in the number of state prisoners over the last seven months, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary John Tilley said. State prisons are at capacity, and county jails are housing a record number of state inmates.

  • Marion County has its own probation and parole office now

    Several years ago, Junior Adams of Lebanon was giving a friend a ride to the probation and parole office in Campbellsville when he noticed several people walking alongside the highway. He wondered why they were walking and soon found out it was because they, too, needed to meet with their probation officer but didn’t have transportation.
    “I thought this is a doggone shame that people have to come over here,” Adams said.