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Today's News

  • Churchill Downs to take more from each bet

    By Gregory A. Hall
    The Courier-Journal

    Churchill Downs will take a bigger cut from each bet when its spring meet starts later this month — a move that could add $8 million to its revenues and increase purses by a similar amount.
    The increase, which takes effect with the start of spring racing on April 26 and includes the Kentucky Derby, means gamblers who cash a winning ticket will collect less money.

  • Horse farm 'worst case of animal cruelty I've seen'

    Some of the horse skeletons on Larry Browning's Pendleton County farm were found still wearing halters. Some were so starved their ribs showed through their skin.
    There was very little hay for the horses to eat, some of it in pools of water along with horse carcasses, county animal control officials said.
    Browning told them he planned to sell all the horses, either to private owners or to slaughterhouses outside of the country, by May.

  • State fire training center in Campbellsville closes

    By Leslie Moore
    Central Kentucky News-Journal

    They learned how to navigate a collapsed building, manage the scene of an airplane crash and how to rescue someone trapped under ice. But Campbellsville and Taylor County Fire & Rescue's firefighters will have to rely on mostly in-house training now that State Fire Rescue Training Area 14 has closed.

  • Ridge racing injures teens

     Four teenagers were injured as a result of an accident while racing early Saturday morning on Scott’s Ridge Road, according to the Kentucky State Police.

    Jacob Smith, 18, Michael Hunter Wimsatt, 18, and Kyle Edlin, 16, all of Lebanon were flown from the scene to University Hospital in Louisville, and Anthony Firment, 18, of Raywick was flown to University of Kentucky Hospital. 

  • Lebanon woman dies in accident on Hwy. 84

    A 62-year-old woman died Sunday morning after a single-vehicle accident on KY 84.

    Ann Hope Mattingly of Lebanon died as a result of the accident, which occurred at 9:59 a.m. April 6 an estimated 3.2 miles west of Lebanon, according to the Kentucky State Police.

    Mattingly was driving east on KY 84 in a 2003 Chevy Blazer when she lost control of the vehicle, which dropped off the shoulder of the road. According to the state police, she over-corrected, left the roadway and struck a tree.

  • Born to care

    Maybe nursing is in her blood, or maybe she just knew from a young age what she wanted to be. Regardless of the reason, Connie Higdon said she can’t see herself being anything other than a nurse.
    And after spending 37 years of her 38-year career working in labor and delivery, she can’t imagine working anywhere else, either.
    “Seeing a newborn baby, every delivery is just like the first one. It’s just a miracle,” Higdon said.

  • City gets preliminary report on flooding

    For the last few months, O’Brien and Gere Engineers has been trying to determine what can be done to avert the kind of flooding that affected downtown Lebanon last year. Monday evening, Elaine Flinn of O’Brien and Gere presented a preliminary report to the Lebanon City Council. Flinn explained that they have conducted a ground survey of the Jordan Creek, reviewed downtown businesses, and partially completed an aerial survey.
    “The Jordan storm system is undersized for a large storm event,” she told the council.

  • Written history

    Marion County residents had a chance to add to their book collections over the weekend when the Marion County Heritage Center held a reception with several Kentucky authors. Some of the authors have local ties to the community and signed autographs with book purchases.
    In case you missed the event, the Friends of the Library will host its own Kentucky Author’s Day from 2-4 p.m. Sunday, April 13.

  • Trail town talk

    Elaine Wilson wants to bring traffic to Lebanon.
    “Think of trail systems as an interstate of people ... if you don’t have an exit ramp coming into your town off that trail system, you’re never going to benefit from all that traffic” said Wilson, the executive director of the Kentucky Department of Adventure Tourism.

  • All their eggs in one basket

    The hunt was on as children of all ages and sizes stormed Graham Memorial Park in Lebanon Saturday morning during the Easter egg hunt. Despite cooler temperatures, a large crowd gathered at the park for the annual tradition.