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Today's News

  • Christmas in the Park is Nov. 23

    Christmas in the Park will take place at Graham Memorial Park in Lebanon Wednesday, Nov. 23.
    The event will officially begin at 6:30 p.m., with free cookies, popcorn and hot chocolate. The lighting of the park will be at 7 p.m. Santa Claus will arrive on one of Lebanon's finest fire trucks at 7:15 p.m.
    The park staff invites you to come out and visit with Santa, enjoy refreshments and walk the track taking in all of the displays sponsored or donated by local merchants and individuals.

  • Veteran, volunteer, survivor

    “Do the best you can with what you’ve got.”
    Simple but wise words from Gary Luce, 54, of Lebanon, whose life has been far from simple, but he’s made the best out of his circumstances.

  • ‘I’m alive’

    Growing up, G.I. Joe was Tabitha Tracey’s hero.
    She was a classic tomboy.
    She and her older brother enjoyed watching Rambo and having walnut wars at their grandparents’ house.
    She learned to shoot a gun at a very young age, and loved to hunt alongside the boys in her family.
    So, it’s really no surprise that she ended up enlisting in the Army.
    But, as a senior at Western Hills High School in Frankfort, joining the armed forces wasn’t on her radar.

  • ‘Kill or be killed’

    Lynn Farmer had no desire to go to war when he was just 18 years old. The conflict in Vietnam was on full display across televisions throughout the United States, the first to be shown to the public in such graphic detail. The number of protesters throughout the United States grew rapidly. Men burned their draft cards to show the world that they wouldn’t be part of the killing.

  • Nickel passes

    The voters have spoken.
    Fifty-four percent of Marion County voters cast ballots in favor of the recallable nickel during the 2016 General Election on Tuesday, Nov. 8. A total of 4,206 people voted for the nickel, while 3,563 voted against it. This is in sharp contrast to eight years ago, when the majority of voters (58.2 percent) voted against the nickel.
    With the additional funds from the recallable nickel, plus matching state funds, the Marion County Public School System will have approximately $30 million that can only be used to build or renovate facilities.

  • Vigil for Deputy Rakes is Monday

    A candlelight vigil will be held at 6:15 p.m., Monday, Nov. 14, on the front lawn of the David R. Hourigan Government Center to honor the memory of Marion County Sheriff’s Deputy Anthony Rakes.
    Deputy Rakes made the ultimate sacrifice for Marion County on Nov. 14, 2012.

  • Becoming leaders

    Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Crepps watched with a smile on his face as one of his cadets stood at attention and recited the JROTC creed. This is something all the students do every day. Regardless of whether or not they will one day be in the military, echoing through the hallways, you might hear the sound of cadets reciting the creed confidently just before class begins.
    Crepps is happy with his more than 100 students in the program, but would always welcome more.

  • American Wood Fibers named 2016 Marion County Industry of the Year

    American Wood Fibers was awarded the 2016 Marion County Industry of the Year Award Friday, Nov. 4, at the Marion County Industrial Foundation’s annual Industry Appreciation Banquet in Lebanon.
    Inter-County Energy Cooperative sponsors the annual event in support of the local manufacturers in Marion County.
    Stephen Faehner, American Wood Fibers CEO, and Pat Krish, vice president of central operations, were on hand to accept the award.

  • Pipeline project in Ky. would not cause major environmental problems, report says

    By Bill Estep
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    The proposed conversion of a natural gas pipeline that runs through Kentucky has cleared a key hurdle, but people concerned about potential environmental problems continue to oppose the project.
    In a report issued this week, staffers at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission recommended the agency rule that the project would not have a significant environmental impact.
    If the commission agrees, it could allow the project to go forward without a more detailed, time-consuming environmental impact study.

  • Sisters win Eastern’s Got Talent contest

    Marion County’s own Katelyn and Samantha Daugherty won Eastern Kentucky University’s annual talent show, Eastern’s Got Talent, recently. The show consisted of 10 separate performances followed by a winner’s ceremony. The Daugherty sisters were the final act and sang Hallelujah. The audience burst into applause multiple times during high points in their performance. All winners received gift cards to Amazon.com, and the Daugherty sisters also won a trophy.