.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Trash old tires for free
  • Green Festival in Springfield April 30

    Now running into it’s third year, the Green Festival will be coming back to Springfield on April 30 to both entertain and educate folks about sustainable living.
    According to Sister Claire McGowan of the New Pioneers, the purpose of the festival is to help people experience the various ways “a community can become more sustainable.”
    “The kinds of food, the kinds of crafts, the kinds of kids activities, the demonstrations are designed to raise people’s awareness of better ways of taking care of earth,” McGowan said.

  • Mission: Love life and have no regrets

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester
    Landmark News Service

    Until she joined the Army Reserves in 1985, Edna Seabrooks hadn’t really left the state of Kentucky. Since joining the Reserves, she’s been on five of the seven continents, and is checking items off of her travel bucket list.
    She’s been to Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland, Iraq, Egypt, Qatar, Kuwait, El Salvador and more. She’s been to the pyramids in Egypt, a German concentration camp, and the Grand Canyon. Most recently, she returned from a trip to South Korea.

  • Autism walk is Saturday

    The sixth annual Working the Puzzle for Autism Walk will be taking place Saturday, and everyone is welcome to attend, according to event organizer Lisa Nally-Martin.
    The walk is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 16, at Graham Memorial Park. In the event of rain, the walk will be moved to Marion County High School.
    Preregistration starts at 9:30 a.m. The opening ceremony will include the presentation of medals to individuals who have been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

  • 10 years of shaving heads and fighting cancer

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester
    Landmark News Service

    When Citizen’s National Bank began hosting St. Baldrick’s in Lebanon 10 years ago, the goal was small: raise $2,000 and shave 25 heads.
    Instead, Marion County raised almost $26,000 and shaved 108 heads. Since that first event, coordinator Sheila Lanham said, “we have had over 797 shavees, that’s counting each shave each year, and raised $234,269.”

  • MCHS student brings stolen gun to school

    A student at the Marion County Alternative School brought a gun to school, Monday, April 11, but made no threats or attempts to use the weapon, according to school officials.
    Marion County Superintendent Taylora Schlosser sent an email to media outlets and school personnel at 10:29 a.m. Monday stating that an incident occurred at the Marion County Alternative School where a gun was seized.
    Law enforcement was contacted immediately, she said.

  • Recallable nickel petition in the works

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester
    Landmark News Service

    A committee to petition to recall the nickel tax has been formed by five Lebanon residents.
    Four of those residents also were on a committee that petitioned to put the nickel tax to a vote in 2007. Randall Lawson, Richie Lee, Robby Shewmaker and Robert Darrell Shewmaker were involved in a similar effort then, and this time they are joined by Joe Livers.

  • Tractor accident victim dies

    A Willisburg woman who was the victim of a tractor accident on April 9 has passed away.

    Marion County Sheriff Jimmy Clements received word from the Jefferson County Coroner Wednesday evening, April 13, that Julie Robinson, 25, was taken off life support and died.

    Robinson was involved in a tractor accident that occurred at 1:57 p.m., Saturday, April 9, on a farm located at 900 Nerinx Road near Loretto. According to Sheriff Clements, she was scraping manure when she lost control of the tractor and overturned into a manure pond.

  • A family affair

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester
    Landmark News Service

    Sitting on a small chair in a bed of spinach Thursday morning, Hugh O’Daniel stopped to answer his cell phone.
    Around him, greens luxuriate in the warmth of the high tunnel — the spinach, two kinds of kale, a couple kinds of lettuce, some arugula. Further down the rows, are beets, celery and carrots, with young strawberry plants. Young tomato and pepper plants bask in soft soil, while plump sweet onions on the far side of the structure await harvest.

  • County nuisances still a nuisance

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester
    Landmark News Service

    The Marion County Fiscal Court discussed, again, a nuisance ordinance, but took no action during Thursday’s regular monthly meeting.
    Judge/Executive David Daugherty said the court discussed nuisance ordinances several times last year, but “kind of put it on the back burner.” After saying that the county has been receiving multiple calls about “junked up” properties, he proposed talking with other judge-executives in other counties.