.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • That’s a bully!

    Bullying.

    No definition needed. 

    That’s because we have all been victims of it. 

    In fact, I would argue we are all a little guilty of it too, whether we realize it or not. 

    But we are not talking about the awkward middle school locker room antics from which we all survive. 

  • City to pay big bucks for flood study

    Representatives of O’Brien and Gere Engineers returned to the Lebanon City Council meeting Nov. 11 to discuss the flooding that affected downtown Lebanon multiple times this year.
    Ken Roseman and Elaine Flynn presented their “Preliminary Investigation and Survey of the Jordan Storm Sewer System” to the council last week. The study showed where they had surveyed the Jordan Creek, and identified possible trouble spots along the waterway.

  • Kentucky joins eight other states in opposing EPA pollution regulations

    Kentucky Press News Service

    Attorney General Jack Conway said Thursday day that Kentucky has joined eight other states in a major brief filed in the U.S. Supreme Court opposing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s new rule on cross-state air pollution.

  • Is Grimes up to unseating McConnell?

    By Amanda Van Benschoten, columnist
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    WALTON - Does Alison Lundergan Grimes have what it takes to beat Mitch McConnell next November?
    That’s been the question on everyone’s minds in the four months since the first-term Democratic secretary of state announced she would run against the powerful Senate Republican Leader.

  • Northern Kentucky's library lawsuit may lead to cuts throughout state

    By Mark Hansel
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    A lawsuit to determine how libraries are funded in Northern Kentucky and possibly in many other districts across the state continues to move through the courts.
    Attorney Jeff Mando filed a brief Nov. 13 on behalf of the Campbell County Public Library supporting the position that its library tax rate should not be rolled back to 1978 levels.

  • Mitch McConnell criticized for taking money from firm tied to health website

    By John Cheves
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is a vocal critic of President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and its glitch-stricken website, HealthCare.gov, repeatedly calling for repeal of the law "root and branch."

  • Reeling one in

    Fishing is an unpredictable sport. And the future of a fishing team at Marion County High School is still uncertain. 

    But it was a topic of conversation at the Marion County Board of Education meeting Nov. 12.

    Jerry Smith, a retired educator and assistant director of athletics, as well as a National Bass Federation representative, attended the meeting to present information about creating a fishing team at MCHS.

  • Rand Paul and James Comer might be Kentucky's next dynamic duo

    By Sam Youngman
    Lexington Herald Leader

    It was one of those full-body laughs where the person rears their head back.
    U.S. Sen. Rand Paul had just stood next to Agriculture Commissioner James Comer in Louisville and praised Comer for returning $1.65 million to taxpayers when the Lexington Herald-Leader asked the senator what lessons he had learned from weeks of media scrutiny and criticism over multiple accounts of plagiarism.
    "Not everybody likes me," Paul said, cracking up.

  • Gas pipeline questions addressed in Bracken

    By Wendy Mitchell
    The Ledger Independent

    BROOKSVILLE - Officials with Williams Corporation/Bluegrass Pipeline addressed Bracken County Fiscal Court on Nov. 13, fielding questions about where, how and when the proposed natural gas liquids pipeline may impact the area.
    Bill Lawson, Williams' spokesperson showed magistrates charts and maps of the proposed line and explained that it was in the acquisition phase of the project with landowners across Ohio, Kentucky and part of West Virginia.

  • Getting coverage

    Ever since the federal health exchanges became live on Oct. 1, national news reports have discussed people having difficulties trying to log into the system.
    Kentucky is one of a handful of states that created its own health insurance exchange, and that exchange, kynect.ky.gov, has largely avoided many of the technical issues that have affected the federal website.