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Today's News

  • Education briefs

    The school board unanimously approved establishing the current Hugh C. Spalding Academy as a separate A5 school beginning with the 2012-13 school year.

    A draft of enrollment and graduation requirements for the Hugh C. Spalding Academy was also presented to the board for the first reading.

    Superintendent Chuck Hamilton, who helped develop an A5 school while he was Mercer County's superintendent, said the school would allow students to earn their diploma, but also give them the flexibility to work.

  • Hear, hear

    Hemp, horses, House districts and H20 were among the issues discussed when Congressman Brett Guthrie visited Marion County last week.

    Guthrie stopped at the Marion County Extension Office Jan. 11 as part of a series of listening sessions he is holding throughout Kentucky's Second Congressional District.

    Guthrie opened with a short presentation complete with charts listing bills passed in the House but not the Senate, budget proposal comparisons and the increasing effect government programs are having on the budget.

  • Tech center can't replace retired teacher

    The Marion County Area Technical Center lost its industrial maintenance instructor to retirement at the end of December. Since school has resumed, students who were in the program have been moved to other programs, and local business leaders are concerned about the impact it could have on the community.

    "We're hoping to get another instructor, but our hands are tied," Marion County ATC Principal Tony Webb said.

  • Striking the right notes

    Beginning musicians are encouraged to take their time learning how to play before learning to play bigger and faster.

    The Kentucky Bluegrass Music Kickoff followed that same pattern, and it has continued to expand its repertoire each year. The 2012 festival will take place Jan. 27-28 at Marion County High School, and it may be the biggest one to date.

  • Back-to-Back

    Mobile, Ala., better be ready because a Marion County contingent will be taking that city by storm again this summer when Paige Wilson competes in the Distinguished Young Woman competition.

    Wilson won the state competition Saturday evening.

    And, she's following familiar footsteps.

  • All God's people

    Scores of people gathered at the Lebanon Post Office Sunday afternoon. Before they started a march to Lebanon First Baptist Church, Maria Bell, president of the United Concerned Citizens Organization, reminded them why they were there.

    "We're here today to show respect for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.," she said, later adding. "He was a man, a man who stood up for what he believed in."

  • All God's people

    Scores of people gathered at the Lebanon Post Office Sunday afternoon. Before they started a march to Lebanon First Baptist Church, Maria Bell, president of the United Concerned Citizens Organization, reminded them why they were there.

    "We're here today to show respect for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.," she said, later adding. "He was a man, a man who stood up for what he believed in."

  • Hilltop Tavern damaged by fire

    A weekend fire left the Hilltop Tavern a little worse for wear.

    "I wouldn't say the building was condemned, but it will take a bit of work to repair," Loretto Fire Chief Tony Hamilton said.

    The Lebanon Police Dispatch received a report of a fire at 6350 Holy Cross Road at 2 a.m. Sunday. The Loretto Fire Department and the New Hope Fire Department also responded to the scene.

    By 2:35 a.m. the firefighters had the flames under control.

  • Tourism taxes $11,000 delinquent

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission is waiting to receive $11,000 in delinquent taxes, interim executive director Wayne Keen reported during the commission's Jan. 9 meeting.

    This was down from the previous month's delinquent tax estimate of $19,000.

    Five restaurants and one temporary concession vendor remain more than two months delinquent on turning in restaurant taxes collected by their businesses.

  • New face of tourism

    Nicky Reynolds didn't set out to have a career in tourism, but that's exactly what happened, thanks in part to a job she had in college working for the National Parks Service.

    "Honestly, at the time, I couldn't have told you that I knew that I was in the tourism industry," said Reynolds, 33. "I just knew that I had a job and I enjoyed it."

    After college, she accepted a part-time position with the Chattanooga Convention and Visitors Bureau.