Today's News

  • Health insurance web site prepares for surge of holiday traffic

    Kentucky Press News Service

    Kentucky’s health insurance exchange, kynect, is prepared for an expected surge in website traffic and new applications beginning Thanksgiving weekend.

  • The press stops, an era ends in Danville

    By Kendra Peek
    The Advocate Messenger

    “Stop the presses” is a phrase that no longer can echo through the pressroom of The Advocate-Messenger.
    The Dec. 1 issue was last to be printed in Danville. Starting Dec. 2, the paper will be printed in Winchester. Troy Maddox, Doug Tillett and a variety of other people over the years have been willing to work the inky, long, hard job of running the now silent press.

  • Hardin County approves easement for Bluegrass Pipeline

    By Marty Finley
    Landmark News Service

    Hardin Fiscal Court agreed to give the Bluegrass Pipeline easement access to county property in southern Hardin County.
    The court approved an easement agreement Nov. 26 granting right-of-way access to 151 feet of property at county-owned Taylor Bend Park, which is southwest of Glendale off New Glendale Road.
    The county will receive payment of $8,070 from the company for rights to access the land, according to the agreement.

  • Pipeline opponents have their say

    Officials with the Williams and Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, the companies working on the Bluegrass Pipeline, addressed a meeting of legislators Sept. 5.
    Toward the end of that meeting of the Interim Joint Committee on Natural Resources and the Environment, Tom FitzGerald of the Kentucky Resources Council was allowed a few minutes to speak on behalf of opponents of the project.
    On Nov. 21, opponents got another chance to address state officials during a meeting of the Kentucky Environmental Quality Commission.

  • Historic high note

    History — recent and otherwise — has been good to President Lincoln’s Own.
    Since the band was included in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln”, they have been included in the National Geographic film “Killing Lincoln” (based on a book by Bill O’Reilly), played at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. during the weekend of President Barack Obama’s second inauguration, and performed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

  • Rigdon’s DNA linked to murder scene

    A special prosecutor dropped a bombshell in Casey Circuit Court on Monday, Nov. 25, by announcing that DNA evidence found at the scene of a 2012 murder in Dunnville links the accused, Bobby Rigdon, to the crime.
    Rigdon was arrested on Oct. 9, 2012 and charged with murder in the Sept. 26 shooting death of Wendell “Gleason” Pyles at Tarter Gate, where Pyles worked in maintenance. Police believe that Rigdon shot Pyles three times while he worked at the pallet mill.

  • Working toward college, career readiness

    A pair of principals came to the Nov. 26 Marion County Board of Education meeting to talk about their goals for their schools and for their students.
    Marion County High School Principal Mike Abell said every student should be college or career ready by the time they graduate during the meeting last week at Raywick City Hall.
    “We want students to be able to build their dreams. If they can't go to college and start their own business, then we want them to be able to get a job in the factories,” Abell told the school board.

  • Holiday season should be about family, not fighting

    My parents, like millions of Americans, got up early to seek out some “Black Friday” deals. For the most part, people were able to get away from the stores unscathed.
    But not everyone did.
    Maybe it’s just because we live in a world with 24-hour news stations and social media outlets that allow anyone anywhere to report what is happening around them, but stories about violence between holiday shoppers seem to be a regular part of post-Thanksgiving reports.

  • Taking a look at education in Kentucky

    Our schools may still have a couple of weeks left before Christmas break and the end of the fall semester, but some of the latest “report cards” on Kentucky’s academic progress have already arrived.
    Perhaps the most well known of those came in early November, when the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) gave its latest breakdown of our fourth and eighth grade scores in reading and math.

  • Kentucky Classic Theatre presents “You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown”