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Today's News

  • Schools looking forward after test results

    Rather than presenting her regular report, Superintendent Taylora Schlosser turned over her time at the Oct. 28 meeting of the Marion County Board of Education to the district's principals.
    "Now, it's time to talk about next steps," she said.

  • A lifetime of lessons

    Sgt. Phillip Chatigny is a retired Army veteran who has been around the world, and served at Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin, at the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea and even on guard duty at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.
    But, none of that prepared him to deal with teenagers.
    Chatigny, 50, now serves as the instructor for the JROTC program at Marion County High School. It’s his second career after a 24-year, 10-month, 22-day career in the U.S. Army.
    Chatigny was born in California at Merced Air Force Base.

  • Training future workforce starts with community partnerships

    By Terri Thomas
    Client Services Manager
    Kentucky Career Center/Lincoln Trail

    Fall break was a restful time for many, but for several Marion County High School students, it was an opportunity to get a closer look at the high-demand field of engineering. Thanks to a dynamic partnership in Marion County, 19 students in the school’s Project Lead the Way program participated in a weeklong co-op program, gaining valuable hands-on experience with area employers.

  • Thinking about energy

    On Thursday, I attended a presentation called "Healthy Future for Our Kids" at the Loretto Motherhouse. Tim Darst of Kentucky Interfaith Power and Light discussed ways people can conserve energy and implement "greener" energy practices.
    He noted that issues affecting Kentucky include air, water and soil pollution and climate change.
    Now, I know some "I'm not a scientist" politicians want to pretend climate change isn't happening, or that it's just a natural part of the Earth. The evidence would suggest otherwise.

  • Veterans Day event at cemetery Sunday

    A celebration to honor Veterans Day will be held at the Lebanon National Cemetery at 2 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 9.
    The event will feature the Marion County Veterans Honor Guard, the Marion County High School ROTC and the Marion County High School band.
    This year's guest speaker is Michael Pape, the district director for the U.S. Congressman Ed Whitfield.

  • Steel Magnolias on stage this week
  • Leaf pick-up in Lebanon

    During the month of November, the City of Lebanon will pick up bagged leaves on Mondays and Fridays.
    Leaves should be placed in bags on the curb.
    If residents need leaves picked up another day, call city hall at 270-692-6272, and they will try their best to get to them, according to an announcement from the city.
     

  • Mills wins re-election

    Marion County voters showed support for Alison Lundergan Grimes in the race for the U.S. Senate, but statewide incumbent Mitch McConnell claimed victory. Grimes won Marion County, 3,267 to 2,498, but McConnell received 806,679 votes to Grimes' 584,622 votes accross Kentucky.

    In the First District Congressional race, incumbent Congressman Ed Whitfield won re-election with 173,020 votes to Charles Hatchett's 63,595 votes. Hatchett won Marion County again, 2,800 to 2,471.

  • Teen recovering after Sunday morning accident

     A Marion County teenager who was involved in an accident early Sunday morning is listed in stable condition at University Hospital in Louisville as of Monday morning.

    Thomas L. Thomas, 17, of Lebanon was driving a 2006 Dodge pickup south on Hwy. 527 when he lost control and the vehicle overturned between Raywick and St. Francis, according to the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The accident occurred at 1:30 a.m. Nov. 2.

    A medical helicopter flew Thomas from the scene to University Hospital.

  • No garbage pick-up on Election Day

     Marion County will not have trash pick-up on Election Day, Nov. 4.

    Wednesday, Nov. 5, will be a double-up day, which means the normal Tuesday and Wednesday routes will be collected on Nov. 5. As a result, sanitation crews may be out earlier than usual, and residents are encouraged to put their trash out early.

    Also, some county offices may be closed that day, so residents are encouraged to call offices to see if they are open before going to those locations.