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Today's News

  • Knights have high expectations

    The Marion County High School boys basketball team has been practicing for nearly a month, and is looking forward to beginning their season soon. The Knights will open up play with a pair of preseason scrimmages. On Friday night, the Knights will travel to Campbellsville University to take on Clinton County in the first of the scrimmages. Tip-off is set for 7:45 p.m.  

  • Lady Knights look to make history

    Coming off a season that ended in heartbreak in the state championship game, the Marion County High School girls basketball team is ready to get that taste out of their mouths. Even with the loss of four seniors, Head Coach Trent Milby believes that his team can accomplish their goals.  
    "Our expectation is the same as every year, but our main goal is a state title," Milby said. "We have come close and have our sights set on getting the job done this season. Either way it has been a great seven years."

  • Deer hunting envy

    The first weekend is gone as I write this. Saturday morning we were greeted by what would normally be unseasonably warm weather. Then, Sunday gave us a pretty windy day.
    To the best of my knowledge that would be excuse No. 14 for Saturday and No. 20-something for Sunday!
    So that was my 10 to 12 hours each day in a tree stand. Unfortunately, that was the story from the majority of my friends.

  • Deer - Mattingly

    Trevor Mattingly, son of Lisa Mattingly, took his first deer during youth season while hunting with his grandfather, Keith Brock.

  • AT&T expects to have 3G here by the end of the year

    Marion County's AT&T customers are closer to having 3G service.

    "We do expect to launch our mobile Internet network in Marion [County], Kentucky by the end of the year, extending access for advanced mobile services, devices and feature-rich audio and video content to customers in the area," wrote Cathy Lewandowski, a senior public relations manager for AT&T.

    Nancy Jarrett, a regional manger for AT&T, has indicated to local officials that 3G could arrive sooner, however.

  • Corrections, Nov. 14

    A story in the Nov. 7 print edition of the Enterprise should have read that Ronnie Ray Stutes, a recent escapee from Marion Adjustment Center, stole a vehicle in Bardstown, was accused of participating in a bank robbery and was arrested in Louisville. The print edition incorrectly reported that another escapee William Paul Monroe had taken the vehicle . Monroe was captured in Harlan County prior to Stutes escape.

    A photo in the Oct. 31 edition of the Enterprise misidentified Kendell Johnson.

  • Kentucky taking the lead in education

    Over the last two decades, Kentucky has built a national reputation for its willingness to blaze new paths when it comes to education. Early this month, we took another major step forward with the release of the latest round of school accountability scores.

  • Lawsuit filed after baby was still born

    A Springfield couple has filed a lawsuit against Lebanon Physicians for Woman after their child, Jeremy, died.

    Marilu and Santiago Tzanahua Mendez of Springfield filed the lawsuit Oct. 31 in Marion Circuit Court against Lebanon Physicians for Women, Dr. Mark Ackermann and Dr. Lynval T. Reynolds.

    According to the complaint, Marilu Mendez underwent a Cesarean section on Nov. 3, 2011, and this procedure was performed by Ackermann.

  • Protect fishing and hunting from whom?

    As I voted on Nov. 6, I almost laughed out loud when I saw the question asking voters to amend Kentucky's Constitution to protect the right to hunt and fish.
    My first thought was protect hunting and fishing from whom, or what?
    Trying to keep people in Kentucky from hunting and fishing is like trying to get diehard UK basketball fans to not wear blue. It ain't gonna happen.
    I've read the arguments behind the amendment - the preservation of a God-given right to harvest game and keep animal herd population numbers in check.

  • Stories worth telling

    On Sunday, hundreds of people gathered at Lebanon National Cemetery to honor the military veterans who have served our country in times of war and times of peace. As usual, the crowd was filled with many of those veterans and their families.
    I couldn't help but wonder what those veterans' families know about their service.
    My grandfather on my father's side, Sylvester Lega, was a World War II veteran. He died a few months before I was born, but I know from conversations with my grandmother that he said very little about his time in the service.