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Today's News

  • A chicken in every pot

     

  • Head above water

    Walking toward a nearly dried up Prather Creek in Loretto, Theresa Hartley reminisces about her childhood home, which used to sit feet away from the creek on Spencer Hamilton Road.
    A cement slab sits on the ground where her family’s garage once stood.
    She can still remember where their dog pen was located on the property. Aside from that, there’s little proof that a home once stood there.

  • Fall fertilization put to good use

     

  • Lawnmower maintenace tips for fall

     

  • Important upcoming deadlines

     

  • Holiday happenings in Lebanon starting Nov. 7

    Christmas arrives in Lebanon on. Nov. 7 this year with a two-day downtown shopping holiday open house. Lebanon celebrates the season throughout November and December with lots of merrymaking and a million lights – moonshine, too.

    Lights, action, Santa!

  • Schools looking forward after test results

    Rather than presenting her regular report, Superintendent Taylora Schlosser turned over her time at the Oct. 28 meeting of the Marion County Board of Education to the district's principals.
    "Now, it's time to talk about next steps," she said.

  • A lifetime of lessons

    Sgt. Phillip Chatigny is a retired Army veteran who has been around the world, and served at Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin, at the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea and even on guard duty at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.
    But, none of that prepared him to deal with teenagers.
    Chatigny, 50, now serves as the instructor for the JROTC program at Marion County High School. It’s his second career after a 24-year, 10-month, 22-day career in the U.S. Army.
    Chatigny was born in California at Merced Air Force Base.

  • Training future workforce starts with community partnerships

    By Terri Thomas
    Client Services Manager
    Kentucky Career Center/Lincoln Trail

    Fall break was a restful time for many, but for several Marion County High School students, it was an opportunity to get a closer look at the high-demand field of engineering. Thanks to a dynamic partnership in Marion County, 19 students in the school’s Project Lead the Way program participated in a weeklong co-op program, gaining valuable hands-on experience with area employers.

  • Thinking about energy

    On Thursday, I attended a presentation called "Healthy Future for Our Kids" at the Loretto Motherhouse. Tim Darst of Kentucky Interfaith Power and Light discussed ways people can conserve energy and implement "greener" energy practices.
    He noted that issues affecting Kentucky include air, water and soil pollution and climate change.
    Now, I know some "I'm not a scientist" politicians want to pretend climate change isn't happening, or that it's just a natural part of the Earth. The evidence would suggest otherwise.