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Today's News

  • Wear purple for Kara

    Kara Tingle has been missing since July 17, 2010. She was last seen on Beechfork Loop Road in Gravel Switch. She was driving a family member's car that was found two days later on Bluegrass Parkway.
    Her family, including her children, Austin, 11, and Nora, 4, will be wearing purple on Friday, Feb. 21, to honor Kara’s 31st birthday. Kara’s family and friends would like to invite the public to join them in wearing purple on Friday to show support. Purple is one of Kara's favorite colors.

  • Ice storm memories from our readers

    Jill Glasscock-Dean
    My Papaw died during that ice storm. Half the family didn’t have electricity trying to prepare and deal with a funeral. Kevin Ford came to my parents’ house and spent the afternoon picking up and hauling off massive amounts of tree limbs and debris in the cold without being asked. It was a huge act of kindness during a very somber time.

    Amy Riney

  • Remembering the storm

    The 2009 ice storm arrived in Marion County on Monday evening, Jan. 28.
    "Roads were beginning to ice over. Limbs were starting to sway to the point of breaking," Marion County Judge/Executive John Mattingly said.
    The storm continued to inflict damage throughout the night and the next day. By nightfall on Jan. 29, the county was hitting rock bottom, according to Mattingly.
    "It was obvious that we were without water pumping capacity, and the lights were out in probably 60 to 70 percent of the county," he said.

  • Lebanon man accused of incest

    Luis M. Cortes-Vergara, 45, of 690 W. Main Street in Lebanon was indicted for three counts of incest (victim under 12) and one count of first-degree sexual abuse (victim under 12) in Marion Circuit Court recently.
    According to the indictment, between Dec. 1, 2012, and Oct. 20, 2013, Cortes-Vergara had sexual intercourse with a person he knows to be an ancestor, descendent, brother or sister who was under 12 years old. The indictment also reads that he subjected a person to sexual contact who was incapable of consent because she was under 12 years old.

  • Marion County's Most Interesting People: The Aspiring Actress

    If you Googled Marion County native Audri Clark, you’d get a lot of standard results: a Facebook page, Pinterest profile, and Twitter account – but you’d also get a result most people can’t say they have, their name on IMDb.
    That’s because Clark, 24, of Lebanon, is an actress who has been in plays and appeared on a web series and TV show.

  • Marion County's Most Interesting People: The Musician

    On Dec. 24, 2007, a fire destroyed many of the contents of Paul Childers' family's home, including his guitar.
    "It was personally the greatest thing that ever happened to me," said Childers, 19.
    About six months before the fire, Childers got his guitar, a Fender Squire Bullet, and it was damaged by the blaze. When the Kentucky Fellowship of Musicians found out, they chipped in to get him a new guitar.

  • Marion County's Most Interesting People: The Renaissance Man

    Jon Howard Michael, 74, of Bradfordsville could quite possibly be the most interesting person in Marion County.
    For starters, he has a photographic memory. He remembers, very vividly, every event of his life, starting at a very young age. He remembers every name, every place, every single detail, down to the year and day of the week an event occurred. It’s uncanny, really. Talking with him can be overwhelming (in a good way) because he literally remembers everything.

  • Marion County's Most Interesting People: The Gardener

    By Will Phillips
    Enterprise correspondent

    Albert Purdy has lived at the same address for nearly 96 years.
    He’s a staple of the Lebanon community and yet, it’s probably safe to wager that many people don’t even know his name.
    Most people probably know him best as the man who sells vegetables on Spalding Avenue in the summer. But many won’t know his name.

  • Marion County's Most Interesting People: Lifelong Learner

    Rose Graves remembers standing outside the Marion County Public Library as a child wishing she could go inside. She said she doesn't really know why she couldn't go, only that she wasn't supposed to go there.
    “They always said, don’t you go to that library,” Graves said.
    Today, no one can keep Graves, 63, out of it. She visits at least four times a week to work on community projects or to research her own family history.

  • Seeing the forest and the trees

    If everything goes according to plan, a forest will surround TG Kentucky in 20 years.
    In order to make that happen, however, factory officials are hoping to get some help from 3,000 volunteers from Marion and surrounding counties.
    “This is not a landscaping project,” Tim Smith told Leadership Lebanon participants on Friday.