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Today's News

  • Top of the barrel

    Barry Shewmaker was at the bottom of the barrel when he went to work at Kentucky Cooperage in 1991. In his first job, he was a barrel stacker, which is exactly what the title implies.
    And he used that experience to build a career.
    Today, Shewmaker is the plant manager at the cooperage, which is owned by Independent Stave Company, and he was recognized as this year’s Outstanding Industry Manager by the Marion County Chamber of Commerce.

  • School daze on school days

    Marion County Public Schools have missed 16 days of school this year, and the school board continues to go back and forth on how those missed days should be made up.
    “I think we have to look at what we think is best for kids,” Superintendent Taylora Schlosser told board members at their regular monthly meeting Tuesday of last week. “Our board is very adamant that we want kids to get as many days of instruction in as possible.”

  • Every school could get a full-time nurse

    While it’s not official until a contract is signed, every school in the Marion County Public School System could have its very own nurse next school year.

  • One last push for House and Senate

    If legislative sessions start like a marathon, they end like a 100-yard dash, as the House and Senate make a final push to turn their goals into law. Leading the agenda, of course, is the state’s two-year budget and highway plan. Legislative leaders began meeting Wednesday to hammer out a compromise, and the good news is that there is some broad area of agreement.

  • It’s what’s on the inside that counts

    Maybe I’ve become more sensitive after having my head shaved, but lately there seems to be lots of news about young women being ostracized because of their hair, or lack of it.
    Last week, there were two stories in the national news involving schools that attempted to suspend or turn away young girls basically because of their hair.

  • St. Baldrick’s at MCDC

    Thirty-seven members of the Substance Abuse Program (SAP) at the Marion County Detention Center, along with a few staff members, participated in their very own head-shaving event Friday morning and raised $500 for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.
    According to Melissa Hoisington, assistant director of the SAP program, MCDC is the first jail in the state of Kentucky to hold a St. Baldrick’s event. Hoisington said she recently taught a class to the SAP participants about giving back to the community, which is what led to the head-shaving event at the jail.

  • County judge/executive candidate - David Daugherty

    David Daugherty, 45, is a 1986 graduate of Marion County High School. He attended St. Catharine College and Eastern Kentucky University and completed 130 hours of business classes.

    He and his wife, Renee, have triplets, Ben, Katelyn and Samantha. Daugherty is employed as a loan officer at Farmers National Bank.

    1. Why are you running for county judge/executive?

  • County judge/executive candidate - Doug Mattingly

    Doug Mattingly, 53, is a 1980 graduate of Marion County High School. He also worked for the Marion County Board of Education doing maintenance until he retired in 2009.

    He and his wife, Charlotte, have two children, Leanne and Logan, and three grandchildren.

    1. Why are you running for county judge/executive?

    DM: I'd like to work for the county and see what good I can do for the county.

  • 15-year-old female has been located

    A 15-year-old female who had been reported missing was located on Wednesday morning.

    Amber Marie Hagerty was last seen at 10 p.m. Monday, March 31, at her grandmother's house in Lebanon. Her mother took her to the Kentucky State Police Post in Columbia at 8:11 a.m. Wednesday morning, April 2.

  • Maker's Mark art

    In conjunction with Maker’s Mark’s 60th anniversary of kicking off the bourbon revolution, a stunning, 36’ x 6’ glass art installation by world-renowned artist Dale Chihuly was unveiled today, March 26, in one of the distillery’s rack houses.

    The artwork will be available for the public to enjoy as a permanent part of the Maker’s Mark distillery tour.