.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • 4-23-14 Church Briefs

    New church opens this weekend
    Open Arms Community Church will be hold its grand opening at 10 a.m. Sunday, April 27. The church is located at 2205 Danville Highway in Lebanon. Bro. Phil Bishop is the pastor. For more information, call (859) 583-4089.
     

  • Tonya Ford loses appeal in murder case

    She has lost a chance at freedom, and could spend 15 more years in prison before getting another one.
    Campbellsville resident Tonya Ford, 40, was found guilty of shooting and killing her husband, Lebanon Police Officer David Ford, in August of 2012. A month later, she was sentenced to serve 20 years in prison for her crimes.

  • Two seek to challenge Whitfield for Congressional seat

    Republican Congressman Ed Whitfield has represented Kentucky’s First District since 1994.
    In 2012, Marion County and a sliver of Washington County were added to that district, but two Democrats are hoping 2014 will bring another change.
    Wesley Bolin, 25, and Charles Hatchett, 62, may be part of opposite ends of the generational divide, but they are united in seeking to unseat Whitfield in November.
    Both see themselves as quite different than the incumbent Congressman.

  • Beshear undecided on special session on heroin

    By Mike Wynn
    The Courier-Journal

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – Hours after an effort to stem heroin abuse died in the Kentucky legislature, Gov. Steve Beshear said April 16 that he hasn’t decided whether to call a special session to resurrect the bill.
    Proposals to combat heroin with tougher penalties for dealers and more money for treatment languished on the House floor on the night of April 15 as lawmakers debated smaller bills and ran short on time. But supporters say the issue is too important to wait until 2015.

  • Guard against phishing in wake of Heartbleed Bug

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – With reports of the Heartbleed bug spreading like wildfire, it’s important to stay vigilant against potential scams.
    The Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions is warning consumers about possible phishing attempts in the wake of the Heartbleed bug – a critical security vulnerability that has put many systems at risk.

  • Mid-Continent classes still meet despite decision to close

    By Kathleen Fox
    The Paducah Sun

    MAYFIELD - One day after Mid-Continent University announced full layoffs and a closure date at the end of June, students, faculty and staff members worked to salvage what’s left of the more than 60-year-old college.

  • Successful session is complete

    Sine die came on April 15 at midnight. In case you don't know what “sine die” means (I did not until I ran for the House of Rep) it is Latin for “the end.” This 60-day session was a very busy one with more than 800 pieces of legislation filed, and just over 100 passed into law. The most important bills of this session were the budget bills.

  • State's snow, ice costs climb to $68 million this winter

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – A winter season punctuated by a polar vortex, sub-zero temperatures, and nasty snow and crippling ice storms created more than a traveling nuisance for Kentucky residents. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet spent more than $68 million on snow and ice removal – about 1 1/2 times the cost of a typical Kentucky winter.

  • Kentucky proud

    Fans of the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have had a lot to celebrate in recent years.
    Kentucky won its eighth NCAA men’s basketball title two years ago, and this year's team reached the tournament finals. In the last few years, Louisville reached a Final Four and won its third championship in basketball, sent a baseball team to the College World Series, won the Sugar Bowl in football and sent its women's basketball team to its second championship game appearance.
    But really, that stuff is meaningless.

  • General Assembly’s work is through, for now

    When the General Assembly left the Capitol late last month for its traditional veto recess – the roughly two-week period a governor has to approve or reject legislation – it was already becoming clear that the regular session’s final two days would be busy.