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Today's News

  • POWR program provides unique way to lose weight

    By Matt Overing
    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    Rita Rawlings has been going to KORT for more than eight weeks. First, it was for her knee – she was there for physical therapy.
    Dr. Melanie Brewer came to Rawlings and told her about the Personalized Orthopedic Weight Reduction (POWR) program, and Rawlings signed on the day after her physical therapy ended.
    Brewer said the program is more comprehensive than other programs and offers a full-body approach, instead of targeting just knee pain or back pain.

  • Bethel Star Apostolic Church ‘building bridges’ in community

    By Matt Overing
    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    One church in Lebanon is hoping to build a positive environment on the city streets.
    Michael Johnson, the pastor at Bethel Star Apostolic Church, said that he wants to give something back to the community that has given him so much.
    “We want people to sense that we can relate to what they are going through,” Johnson said. “We may not agree with their lifestyle choices, but we believe in the person inside.”

  • School lawsuit could be heading to mediation

    Marion County Public Schools have more time to respond to a lawsuit filed by parents who have accused district employees of abusing special needs children.
    But the case might be resolved through mediation.
    The complaint was filed June 12 in Marion Circuit Court on behalf of Paul and Virginia Boone of Lebanon, Elizabeth J. Johnson of St. Francis and Stacey Hall of Lebanon. They are all parents of special needs children who attend or have attended Marion County High School. Hall is also the former principal of the high school.

  • Tomato pasted

    A group of about 20 people participated in the inaugural Marion County Tomato Conflict, and many of them hope to do it again.
    “It was the most unusual, awesome day,” said Genesis Blair, 16, of Louisville, who spent much of the fight tossing tomatoes at her parents and brother.
    Her parents, James and Connie Blair, didn’t even mind that the start of the fight was delayed (the fight was scheduled for 4 p.m., but didn’t officially get going until around 5:45). James Blair said they would definitely come back if they had the chance to do it again.

  • Guys and Dolls, tutus and tomatoes

    Marion County is a happening place.
    In this week’s edition, we have stories and photos from many different events and attractions that took place within our county lines just this past week.

  • Many events in the works at the library

    Cinema at the Square is Friday, Aug. 1. This family movie event will celebrate the end of summer reading and kickoff going back to school. All ages are welcome to attend this movie on the lawn at Centre Square.
    The doors will open at 7 p.m. with activities and games planned before
    The movie starts at dusk. Participants can bring their chairs, blankets and snacks, or they can purchase concessions like popcorn and snow cones from the Marion County Public Library Friends of The Library. Proceeds will support future library events.

  • ‘Look before you lock’ Bill aimed to save children
  • Saying farewell to Lebanon

    By Matt Overing

    I remember my parents would always remind me to thank the parents of my friends that let me come over and hang out.
    I remember thinking it was stupid, because I was going to hang out with my friends, not with their parents.
    When I moved into my own apartment, I realized why you say thanks when you visit another home. It’s courteous to the owner. I learned to appreciate friends that would come over and say thanks.

  • Flushing out the pipes

    If you drove through downtown Lebanon earlier this week, you probably noticed city crews digging up part of the street at the intersection of Main Street and S. Spalding Avenue.
    Whatever temporary inconvenience that may cause, know that their efforts will probably go a long way toward reducing the risk of the kind of flooding downtown experienced three times last year.
    By clearing out a blockage where a portion of the storm sewer collapsed, water should be able to flow more freely.

  • Main Street will be partially closed to clean up collapsed sewer

     Lebanon city employees dug into the city's storm sewer system Monday morning only to discover that they'll need to do even more digging.

    City Administrator John O. Thomas estimated they will be digging another 12-15 feet, and that will mean temporarily closing at least one lane of eastbound traffic on Main Street near the Spalding Avenue intersection.

    City employees dug up a portion of South Spalding Avenue near the intersection with Main Street Monday morning. This was an area where they knew a section of the sewer had collapsed.