.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Seeding annual or perennial ryegrass can help fields recover

     

  • Former deputy jailer indicted again

    A former Marion County Detention Center deputy jailer has been indicted for a second time for introducing contraband into the jail.
    Shawn Perkins, 38, of 2230 Cowherd Lane in Lebanon was indicted in Marion Circuit Court on three counts of first-degree promoting contraband.
    According to the indictment, on or about May 9, June 20 and June 26, 2011, Perkins knowingly introduced dangerous contraband (cell phone) into a detention facility or he aided, abetted or counseled with another in said act.
    His bond was set at $10,000.

  • Three seeking to represent District 3

    Magistrate Roger “Cotton” Smothers would like another term on the Marion County Fiscal Court, but two challengers — Dudley Adle Jr. and Craig Bishop — are hoping District 3 voters are looking to make a change.
    Democratic voters will have their pick of those three candidates in the May 20 Primary Election.
    All three candidates sat down with the Enterprise recently to discuss their candidacies. (Transcripts of those interviews can be found online at www.lebanonenterprise.com.)

    Dudley Adle Jr.

  • Strut Your Mutt is on April 19

    Leadership Lebanon-Marion County Class of 2014 is organizing the Anthony Rakes Memorial Fund “Strut Your Mutt” event, which will take place at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 19, in Lebanon.

  • Cars for a Cause

    Spring View Hospital hosted a car show Saturday, March 22, to raise money for Relay for Life. Dozens of cars were entered in the show, and visitors also had a chance to walk through the Incredible Colon, and inflatable tunnel that showed the differences between a healthy and unhealthy colon.

  • Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory at WMES

    West Marion Elementary School students performed the classic “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” last week.
     

  • This is the last week of legislation for the Senate

    Friday, I was happy to learn that House Bill 31 passed and now heads to the Senate Chambers.

  • House approves two-year highway plan

    If the state’s budget is the most important legislation that the General Assembly approves every two years, enacting the state’s road plan is a close second.
    As with the budget, the goal is to find the best use for a limited amount of resources. This is an area where Kentucky generally gets high marks, however, based on an annual national study by the Reason Foundation that ranks the quality of each state’s highway system. We came in 14th overall last year, with no state having a better quality of rural interstates.

  • Seeing the forest

    When is the last time you got together with thousands of people to do something?
    We don’t mean when were you in a crowd of thousands of people. Maybe you attended a sporting event, ran in a road race or visited a festival, but you — and the rest of the people — weren’t there to work together.
    Well, more than 3,500 people did get together Sunday at TG Kentucky and they did have the same purpose.
    They planted a forest.

  • Rebuild, restore & recover

    Aug. 9, 2013 is a day that changed Jesse and Coury Osbourne’s lives forever.
    It’s the day their home on North Spalding Avenue in Lebanon was nearly destroyed by an electrical fire.
    No one was home when the fire started except their beloved cat Moe, who sadly didn’t survive.
    Every detail of that day is still very vivid in Coury’s mind. She was at work at Marion County High School when she got the terrifying news.