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Today's News

  • Vacant school board seat to remain empty until October

    On top of searching for two new principals, the Marion County Board of Education is searching for a new school board member, too.

  • GES continues search for new principal

    A.C. Glasscock Elementary School continues its search for a new principal.
    Former principal Lee Ann Divine announced her resignation July 9. She’s been the principal at GES for 12 years, but she resigned after accepting a principal position at Mercer County Elementary School in Harrodsburg.
    Until a principal is hired, Marion County Superintendent Taylora Schlosser appointed John Brady, former St. Charles Middle School principal, to serve as interim.

  • Equestrian champion

    Emerson Blandford, 9, rides her Sylr Tomoros Cindy Lu Who. Blandford recently competed in the Tennessean, where she finished in the top three overall after taking two firsts, a second and third place finish to various categories. As a result, she has qualified for the 21 and under division in the Tennessee State Dressage Championships on Aug. 24-25 at Miller Coliseum in  Murfreesboro, Tenn. Blandford is the granddaughter of Doug and Barbara Wright and Phyllis and Joe Blandford of Lebanon. She is the daughter of Sharon and Perry Blandford of Nashville, Tenn.

  • Marion, Washington and Nelson counties could unite for United Way

    United Way of Nelson County would like to see people in Marion and Washington counties unite to help form a tri-county United Way.
    The communities already work so closely together, it just makes sense, according to Kenny Fogle, executive director of United Way of Nelson County, who spoke during the Marion County Chamber of Commerce’s monthly luncheon Thursday.

  • Listen for the call of the elk

    Ever hear an elk bugle? Ever hear one bugle in Kentucky?

    If not, you can take a trip to Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico or one of those “other” elk heavy states. Or, you can load up the family/friends and head to Eastern Kentucky!

    Elk, in Kentucky? Well, they are native to our state. But, they became extinct due to unregulated hunting and habitat encroachment, according to the experts.

    For whatever reason, they were gone for good!

  • Concussions are serious business

    By Nick Schrager

    Enterprise Correspondent

    Imagine 30 state college football stadiums. Now pack them to the brim with people and line them up side-by-side. That is 3.8 million seats. Now, imagine each seat represents a sports related concussion.

  • Make-A-Wish softball fund-raiser

    On July 27, Kroger hosted a softball tournament at Graham Memorial Park and raised $700 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation, according to Assistant Customer Service Manager Jennifer Hays. She said Kroger plans to host another Make-A-Wish softball game in October, but they will also have other events to benefit the same cause. 

    Irvin Abell sponsored Saturday’s game.

  • Monitoring state, local issues

    As we look for ways to increase Kentucky’s competitiveness, we are also looking for ways to reduce excessive spending and keep taxpayers from being unduly burdened.

  • CKCAC needs your help

    By Lynne B. Robey
    Executive Director
    Central Kentucky Community Action Council, Inc.

    Central Kentucky Community Action Council, Inc. is a 501c3 private nonprofit organization, established in 1966, that provides services to approximately 9,000 families, including 20,000 persons of low income in our eight county service area that includes Breckinridge, Grayson, Hardin, LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington Counties. Our central office is located in Lebanon.

  • Nice try, school board

    By Joe Stevens, guest columnist

    The IRS treats everyone the same, appointed government officials do not have leanings towards the party that appointed them, the Benghazi attack on Sept. 11, 2012 was not a terrorist attack, the shooting at the U.S. Air Force Base in Texas was “workplace violence,” and there were no private deals made by the Marion County School Board when considering the next superintendent.