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Today's News

  • Judicial center case dismissed

    A lawsuit related to the construction of the Marion County Judicial Center has been dismissed.

    On Nov. 9, 2011, Maynard and Mitchell Interiors, Inc., filed a complaint against the Marion County Fiscal Court, Codell Construction, and Travelers Casualty and Surety Company of America.

    On April 19, the case was dismissed. The agreed order noted that the parties in the case agreed to bear their own costs and attorney fees.

  • Injury lawsuit partially dismissed against county

    A lawsuit filed last September against Marion County, the Marion County Barn, Road Supervisor Tommy Lee and two John Does has been dismissed. The lawsuit was filed by James C. Smith Jr., 51, of 3420 Hwy. 208 in Lebanon as a result of injuries he suffered from a fall while working on the roof of the county barn.

    According to his complaint, Smith, an employee of Mattingly Construction Company, was attempting to work on the roof of the county barn on or about Oct. 1, 2010, when he fell through a skylight, which had been blacked out by some substance.

  • Court of Appeals finds KSP not negligent in death of informant

    It's been 16 years since LeBron Gaither of Lebanon, 18, was killed after his identity as a police informant was compromised, but his family continues to fight on LeBron's behalf.

  • Scouts' honor

    In 1912, Juliette "Daisy" Low founded the Girls Scouts in Georgia. The 100th anniversary of the Girls Scouts is being marked nationally with the posthumous presentation of the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Low.

  • Sisters offer prayer, welcome for immigrants

    The Sisters of Loretto hosted a prayer service May 8 in Lebanon to call attention to the plight of immigrants in the United States.

    "We make this call in affirmation of our Catholic tradition that holds sacred the dignity of each person," one of the readings stated. "We also recognize our immigrant history established by the rich contributions of generations of immigrants and migrants."

  • Two contested races appear on the primary ballot

    Local voters won't have much to decide when they go to the polls May 22.

    Republicans will be able to vote for possible presidential candidates, while Democrats will cast their ballots to decide who will challenge Congressman Ed Whitfield in November.

    Republicans will have four options to select as their preferred presidential nominees, although according to many in the national media, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney is the presumptive nominee who will challenge President Barack Obama in the fall.

  • Man accused of shooting inside home

    A Lebanon man has been arrested and charged with wanton endangerment after he allegedly shot a gun inside a Campbellsville home.

    According to a Taylor County Sheriff's Office report, deputies received a call at 1:15 p.m., Saturday stating that there were shots fired in a home on New Columbia Road.

    When officers arrived, the report states, witnesses said William R. Rigdon, 27, shot a gun when several people were home.

  • Tourist commission gives preliminary approval to budget

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission voted unanimously in favor of a preliminary budget proposal during its meeting Monday afternoon at the Centre Square Convention Center.

    The commission proposed a few revisions to the budget presented by Nicky Reynolds, the tourism director. The amended budget showed $607,975 in projected revenue in the 2012-13 fiscal year, an increase over the $584,732 in revenue anticipated for the current fiscal year.

  • Economic impact of tourism exceeded $19.5 million in 2011

    Tourism may have been a source of drama within the community in 2011, but it's effect on the local economy continues to grow.

    The Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet recently released the economic impact figures for 2011, and total economic impact of tourism on Marion County was nearly $19.57 million last year.

    That was a 3 percent increase over 2010's economic impact of $18.98 million.

  • A more civil debate

    I'm a fan of the comic strip The Boondocks, and last week, I couldn't help but be reminded of a strip I read years ago.
    Granddad was talking to his grandsons. He thought they might have some questions in light of news reports about "gay marriage," and he wanted them to know how he felt.
    "First off," he tells the boys, "all marriage is wrong."
    Now before anyone gets upset, my parents have been married for close to 40 years, and I don't think they have done something wrong.