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Today's News

  • 10-16-13 Church Briefs

    Clothes closet
    Brookhaven Baptist Mission, located at 135 St. Ann Street, is having a clothes closet every Saturday from 1-3 p.m. For more information call Carla Ramiraz at 270-699-5471.
    Prayer day

  • Legislative meet and greet Saturday

    The Marion County Friends of the Library will host a meet and greet event with State Sen. Jimmy Higdon, State Rep. Terry Mills, Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw and Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly from 9-10 a.m. Oct. 19 in the large meeting room at the Marion County Public Library. 

  • Rev. Calhoun will celebrate 25th anniversary Nov. 2

     

  • Spent cartridges, cash recovered at scene of Danville triple homicide

    By Todd Kleffman

    The Advocate-Messenger

    If robbery was the motive behind the shooting deaths of three people at a Danville pawn shop last month, why would the killer leave more than $1,300 behind in the cash register?

  • Collision knocks out utility pole

    A single-vehicle accident Sunday evening knocked over a utility pole and knocked out the power for some Lebanon residents near the intersection of W. Main and Depot streets.

    Lebanon Police Officer Aaron Caldwell received a report of the accident at 5:47 p.m. Sunday. 

    According to Caldwell, James Beavers, 84, of Lebanon was driving a 2001 Pontiac four-door car.

  • Knightfest

    The Marion County Marching Knights hosted Knightfest Saturday at the high school. Russell County (which is lead by former Marion County band director Curtis Irvin) won the competition with a score of 86.65. Estill County was the reserve grand champion with an 84.125. The Marching Knights did not compete, but they did perform their piece, “The Clockmaker’s Dream” before the final results were announced. 

    Marion County Director Curtis Bennett was pleased with the Marching Knights performance.

  • Monk invasion

    Men of courage and spirit traveled across the globe and visited Lebanon along the way. They brought with them gifts, merchandise and a message of peace. These men taught, learned and loved. 

    And while they may never return, they sure left something behind. 

    Of course, I’m talking about the monks from the Tashi Kyil Monastery, in India.

    I got to experience the monks and their lessons last week in a way different from most. 

    Through the lens. 

  • Thoughts to consider before granting a pipeline easement

    By Terry Geoghegan and Tom FitzGerald

    Landowners  contacted by the Bluegrass Pipeline Partners LLC, the Williams Company or one of their representatives about selling an easement for the construction of a 24-inch pressurized natural gas liquids pipeline across their property, rightfully have questions about whether granting such an easement is in their interest. 

  • Kynect me not? Columnist has trouble with exchange

    By Ryan Craig

    Editor, The Todd County Standard

    Despite the hubbub concerning the Affordable Care Act or Obama Care or (depending on your political leaning) the end of civilization or the beginning of a beautiful tomorrow, I look forward to trying to get different, cheaper insurance.

    Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m kind of like Switzerland when it comes to the idea of a marketplace to shop for insurance.

  • Celebrate Bluegrass history during Archives Month

    From a historical perspective, it is not much of a stretch to say that some of the Western Hemisphere’s first farmers were Kentuckians.

    That’s because the Red River Gorge in Eastern Kentucky is just one of a few hotspots in North and South America where archeologists say modern agriculture took its first steps. Early bands of pre-historic settlers found its soil and climate ideal to domesticate such wild plants as the sunflower, whose seeds added both flavor and nutrition to their food.