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Today's News

  • On-the-job training leads to spirited career

    A batch of moonshine isn’t made overnight.
    And neither is a successful business, especially in the spirits industry.
    But, in less than two years, Limestone Branch Distillery has doubled its sales, introduced several new products, and started a new career for at least one new employee.

  • Sept. 25 - Corrections & Clarifications

    Two students were not included in A.C. Glasscock Elementary School’s Students of the Month for August. They were Madison Knopp and Brandon Hill.
     

  • House GOP strikes blow for inequality; Barr calls food aid cuts 'compassionate'

    From the Lexington Herald Leader

    House Republicans are right to be outraged that 14 percent of American households are on food stamps, but they're outraged for the wrong reason.
    The plight of so many Americans — including the 1 in 5 Kentuckians who depend on food stamps — stems from the worst economic inequality on record.

  • Kentucky shortchanges public education; study shows how funding falls short

    From the Lexington Herald Leader

    Gov. Steve Beshear and many lawmakers have consoled themselves with the soothing fiction that, despite deep cuts in everything from child care to State Police, Kentucky weathered the Great Recession without cutting basic state support for public schools.
    While that might be technically true, the real-life effect of years of flat appropriations, while costs grew, is a decline of almost 10 percent in per-student funding from fiscal 2008 until this year.

  • Fed up

    I received an e-mail last month from one of my constituents expressing her frustration about abuses of government low-income assistance programs. She said she was fed up, and I can sympathize.
    She detailed misuses she had witnessed of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) funds. I am sure many of you reading this have witnessed or heard of people who wrongly use or take advantage of such programs.

  • Education in Kentucky is headed in the right direction

    In the late 1990s, when the General Assembly overhauled Kentucky’s public colleges and universities, one of the reform’s central planks was to improve the level of research.
    To spur that along, the state created “Bucks for Brains” and called on the schools to match that money with private donations, an initiative that has since raised more than $800 million.

  • Life Matters: What murderers cannot kill

    By Dr. David B. Whitlock

  • Church briefs (Sept. 25)

    Friends and Family Day
    First Baptist Church on N. Depot St. will be having a Friends and Family Day at 11 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 29.

  • Perennials anchor color in the garden

    There are some perennials that I can’t live without because of their fabulous late summer and fall performance. Plant them in your garden now because you will overlook them at garden centers come spring. My mixed perennial beds look the best this time of the year (barring any unpleasant summer drought). The black-eyed Susan’s, Russian sage and various species of Aster, Salvia and Nepeta are prolific but they are only mediocre anchor plants compared to some of the other species that come on this time of the year.

  • Ham Days memories and ham recipes

    I’ve been thinking about Ham Days, and there are so many fond memories from days gone by. The first year that my husband, Steve Lowery, worked at The Lebanon Enterprise, 1979, I couldn’t go to the parade or anything else during Ham Days. Our twins, Rachel and Stevie, had only just come home from the hospital after their premature birth, and I was, to put it mildly, busy.