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Today's News

  • Study: Kentucky earns a C in ‘fertility friendliness’

    By Margarita Cambest
    Kentucky New Era

    A study released last week by RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association suggests Kentuckians experiencing trouble conceiving have a 50/50 chance of finding the help they need in the commonwealth.
    The nonprofit gave Kentucky a C in “fertility friendliness.”

  • Former cheerleader's lawsuit against website packs big impact

    By Amber Hunt
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    What are the rules for the Internet? Tech companies as large as Google and individuals as ordinary as the frequent commenters on your favorite website have a stake in the legal drama posing that question that will unfold in a downtown Cincinnati courtroom Thursday.

  • Photo contest celebrates National Historic Preservation Month

    Kentucky Press News Service

    May is National Historic Preservation Month and the Kentucky Heritage Council wants to know, where is your favorite Old Kentucky Home? Show the council by entering KHC’s “This is MY Old Kentucky Home” Facebook photo contest for a chance to win an all-expense paid weekend in Bardstown, site of Federal Hill, the house said to have inspired Stephen Foster to write our state song, “My Old Kentucky Home.”

  • Pension woes continue with state teachers' retirement

    By Kevin Wheatley
    The State Journal

    Kentucky’s next pension headache is closer than you think.

  • Tourism impact reaches $12.5 billion, report says

    Kentucky Press News Service

    The economic impact of tourism in Kentucky amounted to more than $12.5 billion in 2013, Gov. Steve Beshear and Tourism, Arts and Heritage Secretary Bob Stewart announced today. The economic impact figure is a 2.6 percent increase from 2012.

  • Injured vets cycling from Covington to Nashville

    By Alyssa Harvey
    Bowling Green Daily News

    As bystanders waved American flags April 30 along Wilkinson Trace, 150 veterans on bicycles, handcycles and recumbents streamed into the Holiday Inn University Plaza parking lot.
    “Don’t stop!” several of the veterans yelled as they rolled in.
    The veterans were part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Bluegrass Challenge.
    Ride 2 Recovery helps injured veterans improve their health and wellness through individual and group cycling.

  • Vintage steam train to chug into Danville

    By Pam Wright
    The Advocate Messenger

    Train aficionados will be in for a treat May 17-18 when a vintage steam train full of passengers rolls into Danville.
    The Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum teamed up with Norfolk Southern to offer an interactive, historical experience in a vintage train for passengers from Cincinnati to Danville, and back.
    According to Jennifer Kirchner, director of Danville-Boyle County Convention and Visitors Bureau, 670 passengers will disembark in Danville each day.

  • The Amazing Randi: An Honest Liar

    I had intended to write a column this week about politicians, but instead I’ve decided to write about a professional liar, James Randi.
    Fittingly, a documentary about Randi called “An Honest Liar” is scheduled to be released soon. For years, Randi worked professionally as a magician, although he prefers “conjurer”, under the name The Amazing Randi.

  • Corrections & Clarifications - May 7, 2014

    In the April 30 edition, there was some incorrect information reported about the 2014-15 school calendar. The story stated that the calendar had not been approved. Actually, the 2014-15 calendar was approved at the Nov. 26, 2013 board meeting. It was amended at the April 22 meeting to add scheduled makeup days.

  • ‘See Something, Say Something’

    We are over two weeks past the session, and there continues to be speculation about the Governor possibly calling an extraordinary session to act on more legislation, specifically Senate Bill 5. I am opposed to an extraordinary session. We had plenty of time to get the work done during the regular session, and bringing the legislators back to Frankfort would cost the tax payers $60,000 each day. There will be another chance to revisit lingering issues next January.