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Today's News

  • School bus gets stuck Friday afternoon

    Some Marion County students were delayed getting home Friday afternoon when a school bus got stuck while trying to turn around.

    Bus No. 992, which was driven by Fred Browning, got hung up on the edge of the road at the intersection of George Beaven Road and Hwy. 52.

    No one was injured in the incident and a second bus came to get the students and the driver, according to Scott Spalding, transportation director for Marion County Public Schools.

  • Court receives redistricting report

    The Marion County Reapportionment Committee has presented its proposed changes to the county's magisterial districts to the Marion County Fiscal Court. The court accepted the report during its Aug. 18 meeting.

    The fiscal court has 60 days from the time it received the report to either approve it or revise it.

    The committee's goal was to create districts with similar populations without splitting Census blocks (which are set by the U.S. Census Bureau), Marion County Clerk Karen Spalding said.

  • City of Lebanon appeals annexation case to Supreme Court

    The City of Lebanon is turning to the Kentucky Supreme Court regarding its efforts to annex 415 aces of property.

    City Attorney Kandice Engle-Gray has filed a motion for discretionary review, which was received by the state Supreme Court Aug. 16. The city is seeking to overturn a decision handed down last month in which the Court of Appeals ruled that a 2006 annexation by the city was invalid.

  • Camels, Kasbahs and Culture

    The sounds of multiple men chanting in the streets, the sight of camels grazing on the beach, and the scent of spices.

    These are some of the sensations that Laura Jarboe, 22, of Lebanon experienced during her summer trip to the African country of Morocco.

    The trip lasted from June 6 to July 26.

    Jarboe, who attends Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, was originally planning on taking a summer trip to the country of Jordan, but because of political unrest it was cancelled.

  • Library expansion is in the works

    The Marion County Public Library plans to expand, but it won't be happening anytime soon.

    "This is probably about six years down the road," Amy Morgeson, library director, said. "Right now we're just trying to get our foot in the door if grants become available."

  • Search continues for Lee

    Family, friends and community members traveled to Falmouth, Ky, again Saturday to continue searching for Lebanon native Larry Lee. Lee has been missing since Aug. 4 when he walked away from a personal-care home.

    Unfortunately, the search was unsuccessful, and Lee's family is now offering a $3,500 reward for information leading to Lee's rescue.

    Lee, 32, has an acquired brain injury, and is a ward of the state as part of a severe brain injury program. He is also schizophrenic, bipolar, and diabetic.

  • Lebanon pet population flocks to Pampered Pets

    Tammy Robertson of Lebanon didn't expect to end up being a dog groomer.

    At first, she was going to be an elementary school teacher before a magazine called "Dog Fancy" that changed her mind.

    "I'd always loved dogs, and I grew up cutting the next door neighbor's dog," she said. "Then I saw that magazine and knew that's what I wanted to do."

    She attended grooming school at the Colorado Career Academy in Denver.

  • Enterprise announces photo contest winners

  • Fire department calls foul

    The Raywick Fire Department is sending out letters and collecting annual dues from area households, but there still remain unanswered questions regarding the possible misuse of department funds by its former chief.

    In July, former Raywick Fire Chief Chuck Helm resigned saying that his out-of-town job commitments caused him to be away from the community too much. However, following Helm's resignation, the department began an internal investigation into possible misuse of funds, and that investigation is ongoing.

  • A step in the right direction

    Old, worn out and used shoes may be just the thing to help provide clean drinking water to people living in developing countries. Marion County is now collecting shoes to benefit Edge Outreach's Shoes for Water program.

    "It's just a really good opportunity that helps with the environment and helps people," said Keith Brock, Marion County solid waste coordinator.