Today's News

  • Veterans driver's license now available

    Kentucky veterans have the option of having their driver's license imprinted with a "Veteran" designation, however, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has reported that there has been some confusion about the veterans license.

    Veterans who wish to have the veteran designation on their license must present form DD214 when renewing their license at their local circuit clerk's office. DD214 is the Department of Defense form that verifies military service.

  • State rep candidates address Friday Forum

    Incumbent State Rep. Terry Mills and challenger Bill Pickerill both addressed the community Oct. 5 at the David R. Hourigan Building. While both are familiar faces in the county, their talks gave them an opportunity to introduce their campaigns.

    The two candidates flipped a coin, and as a result Pickerill spoke first during the First Friday Forum luncheon, hosted by the Marion County Industrial Foundation.

    Pickerill would like to see some changes made in Frankfort.

  • Kentucky voters will consider 'right to hunt' amendment

    On Nov. 6, Kentuckians will have the opportunity to vote on amending the state constitution to explicitly include the right to hunt.

    The General Assembly approved legislation during the 2011 regular session to put the amendment on the ballot this year. The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources worked on the bill along with the League of Kentucky Sportsman and the National Rifle Association.

  • R.L. Schrieber working on expansion

    Greg Ransdell, CEO of R.L. Schreiber, visited the Marion County Industrial Foundation Board on Oct. 2 and provided an update on the company's plans.

    "The company is going through an enormous change," Ransdell said.

    R.L. Schreiber opened its Lebanon plant in May of 2011 with plans to hire 83 employees. To date, Ransdell said the Lebanon plant employs more than 60 people, and he anticipates it will have more than 83 employees after a new high-efficiency, production line is installed.

  • Smith pleads to wanton endangerment

    A Lebanon man who was facing an attempted murder charge has pled guilty to first-degree wanton endangerment.

    James C. Smith, 51, of 3450 Hwy. 208 was arrested Dec. 10, 2011. According to the arrest report, Catherine "Kitty" Smith, his ex-wife, wrestled the gun away from him before fleeing their home and going to her daughter's house.

  • Special educator ends 31-year career on high note

    It takes courage to follow one's heart, and that's exactly what Debbie Spalding did 31 years ago when she accepted her first job as a special education teacher.

    This month, Spalding will retire from the only career she has ever known.

    But, initially, it wasn't her first career choice.

    She had planned on becoming a nurse. She even went to nursing school, but experiencing the death of several of her patients was too much for her.

  • Susie's Bottoms Up 'likely' to have discriminated against blacks

    The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights has concluded that there is "probable cause to believe unlawful discrimination" occurred at a Raywick bar earlier this year. The complaints stem from accusations that Susie's Bottoms Up Bar and Grill and its owner, Susan Riggle, denied entrance to African-Americans.

  • The newspaper still matters

    This past July marked my 10th year with The Lebanon Enterprise.

    And in those 10 years, things have changed drastically with this newspaper.

    Actually, the word "drastically" doesn't even begin to describe the number of changes we have experienced here at the Enterprise.

    Our heads are still spinning, to be honest.

    But, there is one thing that hasn't changed.

    Newspapers still matter.

  • Be aware of the warning signs of an abusive relationship

    By Delena Trent

    October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

    In observance of this The Caring Place put together a checklist of "signs" of a relationship that is headed down a dangerous path. 

  • A bright future lies ahead for newspapers

    By Caroline H. Little

    There's an excessive amount of gloom and doom being spread around these days when the talk turns to the future of newspapers. In fact, the mere mention of the future of newspapers suggests that there might not be one. There is no question that the newspaper business has been disrupted. And yet, what the doomsayers fail to see is that newspapers are well on their way to ensuring that a bright future lies ahead.