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Today's News

  • Committee selects Lebanon Elementary for pilot reading project

    The Marion County Board of Education announced recently that it plans to spend more money in hopes of improving the district’s reading scores.

  • History by the page

    Eula Ray Kirkland spent the last three years working on a book about the history of Bradfordsville, but the story has been centuries in the making.
    The book “Bradfordsville Kentucky Community History” is 846 pages filled with anecdotes, family histories, maps, and documentation about churches, businesses and schools that have served the community going back more than 230 years.
    When the first 400 copies of the book arrived a few weeks ago, Kirkland said she and the other members of the Bradfordsville Historical Society were more than pleased.

  • Education vocation

    Editor’s note: This is the first story in a series about the 2012 Marion County Chamber of Commerce “Outstanding” award winners.

    Paula Walston’s love for books began before she could even read.
    She vividly remembers sitting with her grandfather as a little girl and “picture reading” to him.
    But, what she didn’t realize at the time was that her grandfather was doing the exact same thing.

  • SB 9 hits home for local family

    Senate Bill 9 is a piece of legislation that Melissa Lee Knight takes quite personally.
    If signed into law, the bill would require possible lawsuits against nursing homes to go through a review panel before going to court. The bill passed the Senate last week and now awaits a vote in the House of Representatives.

  • Taylor County Animal Shelter to stop adoptions

    The Taylor County Animal Shelter will no longer be a place for would-be pet owners to find a new family member.
    Instead of offering animals for adoption, the shelter will soon serve as a holding place for the county's stray animals.
    In 45 days, animals will no longer be up for adoption at the shelter, which set up shop at a new home last month after a $150,000 grant paid for construction of a new building.

  • Corrections and clarifications

    In the Feb. 6 edition of The Lebanon Enterprise, there was a mistake in the story about David Ray Clarkson Jr.’s struggle with mental illness. The story stated that in Kentucky if you have a Medicaid card it will pay for mental health treatment or substance abuse treatment, but not both. Actually, Medicaid pays for mental health treatment, but not substance abuse treatment.

  • Greater Tuna never gets old

    For the first time in 11 years, Lynn Farris and Mike Thacker are bringing tuna back. (Not to be confused with bringing sexy back.)
    They are older.
    They are wiser (allegedly).
    And one of them has lost practically all of his hair.
    But, they’ve still got “it” on stage.
    I spent an hour with them Saturday and laughed with them (and at them) the entire time.
    So, what made them decide to bring the play “Greater Tuna” back to the stage?

  • Senate still moving in short session

    In a 30-day “short session” like this year, it’s difficult for both chambers to fully consider the hundreds of bills that have been filed. However, over the last two weeks, the Senate has taken early action on major legislation, giving the House more time to study those bills.
    This week the Senate passed important bills addressing school safety, the state’s General Fund debt, economic development and healthcare.

  • Another time around for a few bills

    For those who regularly follow the General Assembly, this past week in the Kentucky House of Representatives offered a little bit of nostalgia, given that several of the bills we voted on have been through the chamber before.

  • 2-13-13 Marion County High School Students of the Week