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Columns

  • Summit addresses fracking threat and energy choices

    By Chris Schimmoeller 

    With the dramatic expansion of the fracking industry in neighboring states and new interest in Kentucky’s deep shale formations, it’s important to look closely at the consequences of fossil fuel use and alternatives for Kentucky.

    The proposed Bluegrass hazardous liquids Pipeline was our wake up call.

  • Creating opportunities for workforce enhances collective community

    By Davette Swiney
    President/CEO of Central Kentucky Community Foundation

    Increasing the caliber of our community starts with a commitment to affecting the lives of individual citizens.

  • There is still lots to learn at legislature

    With recent rain showers and storms rolling through Kentucky as cool and warm weather mix, along with getting into the heart of football season and leaves turning and beginning to fall, autumn is officially here. Along with that, we are very close to an important election day as we go to the polls to choose our next U.S. Senator as well as many local and state officials who will shape policy over the next two to four years. Again, I want to encourage you to exercise your right to vote on Nov. 4 or call your clerk about voting via absentee ballot in the case you will be out of town.

  • Sorting the junk (mail)

    It's that time of year. The time when no matter where you go, you see it, even if you think it's too early to worry about.
    That's right, it's political season ... although sometimes I wonder if it ever ends.
    For many of us, politicking has been invading our mailboxes of late, too.
    Over the last few weeks and months, I've come home to multiple pieces telling me that: - - Mitch McConnell is great for Kentucky
    - McConnell is just another Washington insider

  • Library hosting genealogy and other activities

    By Jama Watts
    Guest columnist

    In the state of Kentucky, October is Archives Month, making it the perfect time to break out the shovels and dig up those ancestors! From 5- 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, the library is hosting a genealogy workshop with yours truly. 

  • Exercise your right to vote on Nov. 4

    This month, I will begin visiting schools throughout the district as part of the America’s Legislators Back to School Program. My presentation includes teaching our form of government and explaining how our representative democracy works. The program is actually a nationwide event and is made available by the National Council of State Legislatures.

  • Newspapers are the ‘tie that binds’ people together

    By Robert M. Williams, Jr.
    National Newspaper Association President

    What do you care most about in life?
    Most of us would put family at, or near, the top of such a list. Friends would be there. So would our jobs or businesses, our livelihoods. Our homes. Maybe our pets. Our hobbies and pastimes. Add in those around us: Neighbors, the community, etc.
    That’s our world, our “sphere of influence.” Whatever happens to those who inhabit that place in our hearts and lives means something to us.
    We monitor.

  • Newspapers are community

    By Keith Anderson
    Director of News, ECM Publishers

    There are hundreds of beautiful towns in the United States. And each of them has a claim to fame. Whether it’s the Fire Hydrant Capital of the world in Albertville, Alabama, the giant statue of Paul Bunyan welcoming visitors to Brainerd, Minnesota, or the giant ice cream sundae statue in LeMars, Iowa, every city has a desire to be known for something.

  • America’s newest battle – fighting Ebola

    The wars military men and women fight on America’s behalf are not always on the battlefield, or at least not what most of us envision when we hear the word “battlefield.” I was vividly reminded of that when I heard the news last week that more than 60 airmen and women from Kentucky’s Air National Guard were preparing to depart to Senegal. Their mission is to help establish a cargo-processing hub for Operation United Assistance, the international effort to battle Ebola in West Africa.

  • A real-time look at the impact of domestic violence

    Each fall, the National Census of Domestic Violence Services takes a real-time, 24-hour look at the true impact domestic violence has on our country.
    Nearly 90 percent of the United States’ care and prevention programs participate, including Kentucky’s. According to the survey’s latest findings, they provided shelter to more than 36,000 victims on Sept. 13, 2013, the latest year in which information is available, and another 30,000 received non-residential help ranging from counseling to legal advocacy.