• Small businesses, downtowns offer unique holiday shopping

    By Patricia Krausman

    As the holiday shopping season gets underway, and as you rush about from store to store looking for the perfect gift for a friend or loved one, consider what shopping local means for our region’s economy.
    This Saturday is Small Business Saturday, a time when customers are encouraged to shop locally for their holiday gifts and purchases and to recognize the role small businesses play in keeping our communities prosperous.

  • The history behind Thanksgiving

    This week, our family and friends will gather around the dinner table as they have for generations to celebrate a holiday that is nearing its 400th anniversary.
    As even some of our youngest students can tell us, what is widely considered to be America’s first Thanksgiving took place in 1621, when the Pilgrims and a tribe of Native Americans came together for a three-day feast to give thanks for a successful harvest.

  • Fear Not

    By Carrie Bridgman

    Since the terrorist attacks in Paris, our politicians are declaring that they don't want to accept any Syrian refugees. Hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing ISIS and fleeing Bashar al Assad, who has repeatedly dropped chemical weapons on cities. Where do we expect them to go? "Home" is not an option.  European countries were struggling before the refugees arrived. Our economy isn't fabulous, but it's in better shape than the economies of much of the rest of the world, and we've got more room.

  • The long road of adoption leads to a new addition

    By Linda Ireland
    Guest columnist

    We welcomed a child into our family in May.
    Samuel Bedane (B’donny) is the fourth child of my daughter, Amanda Higginbotham and her husband, Adam. He has big brown eyes, just like his three sisters – but it’s due to chance, not heredity.
    Bedane – or “Nonny” as he likes to call himself - is adopted.
    I met my granddaughters very soon after they were born. I learned their personalities, their likes and dislikes - their hearts - as they grew.

  • Just what we need

    By Carrie Bridgman

  • Education really does pay

    In the late 1990s, the state rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.”
    That popular slogan came on the heels of a landmark overhaul of our public postsecondary schools and the creation of such programs as KEES, the lottery-based college scholarships that high school students earn with good grades, and “Bucks for Brains,” which added hundreds of millions of state and private dollars to our university research budgets.

  • Shop local: It’s more than just a slogan

    As Christmas draws near, Kentuckians are gearing up for the shopping season. Many shoppers plan their Thanksgiving weekend around Black Friday advertisements while others scope out the latest online deals for Cyber Monday.
    But there is another option – shop local.

  • Regional events prep entrepreneurs for next steps

    By Lisa Williams

    Entrepreneurship is the backbone of our business community, and as our region grows, it’s clear entrepreneurs will play a key role in creating jobs, bringing ideas to life and expanding our communities’ quality of life.
    Global Entrepreneurship Week, Nov. 16-22, sets out to celebrate entrepreneurship - from the small retail business owner to those who have grown major industries – and to connect new entrepreneurs to the resources and information they need to take their next steps.

  • One way to Heaven

    By Joshua C. Hicks

  • Take a moment to observe Veterans Day

    I’m impressed every time I walk into the Kentucky State Capitol to do the business of the people. Its marble hallways are full of memorials.
    A large bronze statue of former President Abraham Lincoln stands in the center of the Capitol rotunda. Portraits of state Supreme Court justices line the second-floor hallways. Porcelain miniatures of Kentucky’s first ladies grace the area just off the rotunda. And a bust of Colonel Harland Sanders even greets visitors entering from a side entrance.