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Columns

  • Sen. Wendell Ford truly made a difference

    Late last week, Kentucky lost one of its true statesmen with the passing of former U.S. Senator Wendell Ford.
    Since then, there have been numerous accolades about his many accomplishments in Washington, D.C. – from helping to write and pass the Family and Medical Leave Act to promoting Kentucky’s signature coal and tobacco industries – but it is worth noting that several actions taken during his time as governor continue to benefit Kentuckians today.

  • Lots of work to do in Frankfort

    Greetings from Frankfort. After a busy and very productive first week of the session, we are in adjournment until Feb. 3. Yet, we still have much work to do. The last date for new bills is Feb. 13, and that means that we are working to see what legislation needs priority and how to move forward efficiently. I have been traveling to Frankfort and meeting with the other leaders to prepare.

  • Major issues to be addressed by March

    There may only be 30 working days in this year’s legislative session, but it already seems like there are about twice as many major issues needing to be addressed before the General Assembly wraps up its work in late March.
    Because the state operates under a two-year budget, and our constitution therefore requires larger majorities in the House and Senate to “open it up” in odd-numbered years, few of the bills filed have a significant financial impact.
    Even so, that does not lessen the importance of those that may become law.

  • Career centers focus on advanced manufacturing training

    By Sherman Bowman

    The Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board and the Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail are pleased to announce a new training program to help both job seekers and employers in one of our region’s most promising job sectors – advanced manufacturing.
    Through a grant-funded initiative, called Kentucky Career Center Get Opportunity (KCCGO), we’ve developed intensive, no-cost training to help up to 90 job seekers start or re-enter their career in manufacturing.

  • No ordinary fish

    I don’t know about you, but my mind has been consumed with “bad news” lately.
    So, if I may, I’m going to lighten the mood for a bit.
    I want to tell you a story about a fish named “Dempsey.”
    Dempsey is no ordinary fish.
    For starters, he’s a parrot cichlid, and his ancestors were first created in Taiwan around 1986.
    He’s “manmade” so to speak.

  • Kentucky’s Regular Session is in full swing

    The Kentucky General Assembly convened its 2015 Regular Session this week, with more than 200 bills already filed and ready for consideration.
    In many years past, the first week of this off-year “short” session was spent mainly on formalities like electing leaders and appointing committees, with the real work of passing bills beginning in February. But with only 30 days to accomplish so much, I’m proud to say the Senate got down to business passing legislation.

  • Issues to be debated during legislative session

    Although legislative sessions in odd-numbered years are relatively new in Kentucky – the first was held in 2001 – the General Assembly has long met during the first full week of January in these years to elect House and Senate leaders and update committee assignments.
    While the top four leaders in both chambers remained the same last week, there were some changes in the other leadership positions; in fact, nine of the 16 House and Senate leaders are new.

  • Kentucky’s rankings are both good and bad

    As states look for ways to improve their quality of life, the first thing they usually do is see how well they stack up with the rest of the country.

  • Bits and pieces to start the new year

    With a new year just beginning, it's a good time to remind everyone to be careful on the roads.
    That is never truer than when emergency vehicles are trying to reach a scene. Anyone who has been in a car has been on the road when the flashing lights have appeared and sirens have been sounded.
    Unfortunately, too many of us fail to do what we should to help those emergency vehicles. That means pulling over as close to parallel as possible to the edge or curb of the road, per Chapter 189.930(a) of the Kentucky Revised Statutes Chapter.

  • Kentucky NCRC predicts workplace success

    By Jim Skees

    Finding the right talent to fill available jobs is a top concern for more and more business leaders. In fact, many employers ready to expand or relocate say a competitive workforce weighs heavier in their location decision than the availability of shovel-ready sites.
    While every job requires its own specific skills and knowledge, existing and potential employers alike seek candidates with proven workplace skills – the basics that demonstrate a candidate can solve problems and succeed.