• ‘All Shook Up’ on stage in Springfield this weekend

    By G.B. Dixon

    It will not be religious fervor that makes folks shake, rattle and roll this weekend in Springfield, just a love for the sights and sounds of the 1950s and a ticket to the musical "All Shook Up," presented by the Central Kentucky Community Theatre Youth Actors.

  • State will keep its promise to teachers

    As things have seemingly calmed down after the end of the 2015 Legislative Session in Frankfort, I would like to once again address the KTRS issue by reassuring all teachers that we are committed to finding a solution.

  • Kentucky to take on a bigger leading role in TV and movies

    Kentucky may be a couple of thousand miles away from Hollywood, but that hasn’t diminished our connections to the entertainment industry. Some of today’s most famous actors, for example – George Clooney, Jennifer Lawrence and Johnny Depp – were born here, while Tom Cruise spent part of his youth in Louisville.

  • Kentucky businesses setting export records

    By Kim Huston

    When the U.S. Commercial Service (USCS) office in Louisville - the export promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration - first approached Bardstown manufacturer Armag Corporation in 2009 about selling overseas, the company was busy running a well-known domestic business in a niche market. With products that can be up to 2,000 square feet in size and take a few months to build, exporting was not part of their business strategy.

  • Session was a success

    If it’s true that it takes years of preparation to be an overnight success, the same can also be said of many laws approved during a legislative session.
    This year is a prime example, with several high-profile measures having been considered by the General Assembly before. That includes those addressing booster seats, dating violence and an update of the state’s telecommunications laws.

  • Diverse regional team drives workforce development efforts

    By Tommy Turner

    Now more than ever, driving a community’s prosperity depends on effectively managing and leveraging workforce development opportunities.
    In the past several years, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board has focused on progressive efforts that have had a positive impact on our workforce, from strengthening partnerships across the bi-state Greater Louisville region to supporting our communities’ preparation for realignment at Fort Knox to helping transitioning veterans and military spouses connect with employers.

  • Kentucky Career Center - Lincoln Trail first to earn region-wide certification

    By Daniel Carney

    As an economic developer for Springfield and Washington County, my job centers on business attraction and business retention for our community. Much like my counterparts throughout the Lincoln Trail region, my success is typically measured in job growth and more broadly what I do to help position the community for greater economic prosperity.

  • Life-saving, landmark legislation in effect

    Life-saving, landmark legislation was achieved by the Kentucky General Assembly during the final hours of the 2015 short session. Senate Bill 192, a comprehensive approach to address the scourge of heroin addiction in Kentucky, reached final passage after countless hours of bipartisan work throughout this session. In fact, this is the third year that the Senate has led the charge on heroin legislation. The bill was signed into law Wednesday morning, March 25, by Gov. Beshear, and is now in effect due to an emergency clause.

  • Marriage for all, or at least anyone who wants it

    On the national level, a variety of news stories are always competing for attention, so you may have missed what I consider some particularly good news.
    In March, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (USA) voted to change its official definition of marriage. As a result of that vote, that church body now defines marriage as a "commitment between two people." (See story here: http://goo.gl/c6df3J.)

  • General Assembly has more than one winner

    In one way, the bills filed each legislative session are not much different from the teams taking part in the NCAA basketball tournaments. Some advance, while others find out that this is not their year.
    There is one key difference in the General Assembly’s version of March Madness, however: More than one “winner” is crowned.