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Columns

  • Forever grateful for our first responders

    They may wear a variety of uniforms and have different areas of expertise, but one quality binds all first responders: They’re the ones who immediately run toward an emergency when the first impulse is to run away.
    Their invaluable contributions have been highlighted in recent weeks in the aftermath of the Boston bombings, the ricin-poisoned letters in Washington, D.C., and Mississippi and the explosion at a Texas fertilizer plant.

  • Conserving energy, saving money

    When it comes to energy, less really is more if it gets the same job done. As our country works to maximize every watt, amp and BTU, it’s worth noting that Kentucky is playing a major role in leading the way.

  • YOUR MONEY AT WORK: Central Ky Community Action Council, Inc.

    Editor’s note: This is the fifth story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer look at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

  • 4G is coming … eventually

    If you have a cellular phone, you are probably aware that 3G service is available in Marion County, regardless of who your provider is.
    Recently, I received an email asking when 4G is coming.
    I guess that’s an inevitable question since wireless service advertisements are touting 4G devices and networks. As we all know, that doesn’t mean that service is available everywhere.
    I sent emails to both AT&T and Bluegrass Cellular last week to try to find out more about 4G. Here’s what I’ve heard so far.

  • A boost in education pays off

    Over the last generation, Kentucky has seen a lot of success when it comes to boosting the education level of our workforce.
    Since 1994, according to the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE), the number of those employed who have a bachelor’s degree has jumped 80 percent, while those with a high school diploma or less has dropped by more than a tenth.
    That’s a trend that needs to continue, because CPE estimates that, by the year 2020, more than half of Kentucky’s jobs will require at least some college experience.

  • The 26th magical mile

    Before I wrote this column Monday evening, I had to go for a run.
    I had been sitting at my desk all afternoon and evening reading reports about the explosions that killed at least two people and injured hundreds of others near the finish line at the Boston Marathon. I held back tears as I viewed images taken by photographers of the gruesome scene, the sidewalks covered in blood.
    Initially, I thought it had to be a hoax.
    Why would anyone do something like this at one of our oldest, most prestigious running events?
    It was unthinkable.

  • Get ready for Family Bike and Hike

    Imagine getting up earlier on a beautiful day and going somewhere where everyone is excited and in a great mood. The atmosphere is uplifting, knowing you are about to do something fun that is also wonderful for your health. The sense of accomplishment that you will feel at the end is amazing! And anyone can do it!

  • Legislature is working to improve the lives of children

    Every legislative session, the General Assembly looks for ways it can improve the lives of our children, both in the classroom and when it comes to their safety.
    This year, the House and Senate passed several new laws that further both of these goals.
    One of the more widely publicized will establish a permanent, independent panel to review those cases in which a child either died or was severely injured as a result of abuse or neglect.

  • Sen. Paul on his filibuster

    By Rand Paul

    U.S. Senator

    If I had planned to speak for 13 hours when I took the Senate floor to start my filibuster, I would’ve worn more comfortable shoes. I started the filibuster with the words, “I rise today to begin to filibuster John Brennan’s nomination for the CIA. I will speak until I can no longer speak” — and I meant it.

  • Big finish to a good session

    The 30-day session of the General Assembly concluded at midnight March 26, after two long days of hard work and bipartisan collaboration to ensure the state’s most pressing issues were addressed.