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Columns

  • Get healthy, Kentucky

    Of all the challenges Kentucky can expect to face in the years ahead, few if any are bigger than improving our collective health.
    In some key areas, we already have a good head start. Kentucky is among the top 20 states in fighting infectious diseases, for example, with the use of vaccines high and the percentage of older citizens getting a flu shot above the national average.

  • The struggling coal industry is a statewide issue

    There were several Interim Joint Committee meetings this past week, including a Special Subcommittee on Energy that focused on Kentucky’s struggling coal industry and the adverse impact of impending federal regulations. The decline in coal production that could result from these regulations is not just an Eastern Kentucky issue, but a serious statewide issue, as well.

  • Free seminar about the dangers of sports concussions this Thursday

    By Melissa Lee Knight
     
    My brother, Larry Lee, suffered a brain injury at the age of 12 from a farm accident and though it seemed he healed physically in a relatively short time, by the time he reached high school we realized his injury would have repercussions that affected his whole life. We knew Larry’s symptoms were a direct result of a very traumatic brain injury, but not all head injuries are that easy to spot. 

  • Consensus Forecasting Group and its crystal ball assist state government

    They may be relatively unknown, and their subject matter may be a little dry, but the eight economists who comprise the Consensus Forecasting Group have a powerful role to play: They determine just how much money state government can expect.
    As anyone who has ever put a budget together knows, it can be tough to predict what a year will bring. Their job, however, is even more difficult: They have to look more than 30 months ahead, to cover not just the two-year span for the budget but also the six additional months needed to prepare, pass and implement it.

  • Senator Jimmy Higdon’s Frankfort Report

    FRANKFORT – The past couple of weeks have been busy in and around Frankfort with joint committee meetings on a wide range of issues including the DOD’s planned forced brigade reduction at Ft. Knox, the possible ways to help SNAP recipients better balance their food budgets, and the impact of impending federal regulations on coal.

  • Trying to slow down a pipeline

    I received a phone call Friday from a citizen concerned about the Bluegrass Pipeline. He’d heard it could be coming through the northwestern part of Marion County.
    If you haven’t heard about the pipeline, here’s what I’ve been able to learn so far.  According to the official website for the project (bluegrasspipeline.com), The Williams and Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, LP, are working on the project, which would transport natural gas liquids from Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio to the northeastern United States and the Gulf Coast.

  • Do Not Call Registry celebrates anniversary

    For those of us who recall what it was like to have dinner regularly interrupted by unwanted telemarketers, late last month was a special time, because it marked the 10th anniversary of the National Do Not Call Registry.

  • The King is home, let's keep him here

    I celebrated my birthday last week, and while I’m a year older, I’m still too young to have experienced the Elvis Presley era.
    Well, I got a glimpse of it Friday night right here in Lebanon.
    And, let me tell you, it was an experience.
    As I stood in line waiting to enter Angelic Hall for Eddie Miles’ concert - “A Salute to Elvis and Country Legends” - I felt a little out of place because, well, almost everyone else was a tad bit older than me.

  • Road improvements completed near New Haven

    As we mark the reopening of Highway 247, I would like to express my appreciation to Governor Steve Beshear and the Transportation Cabinet officials in Elizabethtown for making the repair of the highway, as well as the Bull Run Creek safety project, high priorities for emergency funding.

  • Push for higher dropout age continues

    At the end of each legislative session, there is understandably a lot of discussion about what the General Assembly has passed.
    Although not given as much fanfare, the early to middle part of summer is an important period as well, because – other than those relatively rare cases when there is a specific enactment date or an emergency clause – that is when all legislation actually takes effect.  This year, that date fell on June 25.