• Our work makes a difference

    At their core, the major American holidays are bound by a common thread: They remind us of who we are and what we stand for, each and every year.
    While the Fourth of July celebrates our founding and freedom, Memorial Day and Veterans Day call on us never to forget the high price paid for those enduring gifts. Thanksgiving gives us a moment among loved ones to appreciate the many good things in our lives, and on Labor Day, which arrives this weekend, we pay tribute to the hard work that made our nation what it is today.

  • When in doubt, use the money stroke

    It was almost the end of December when we traveled from Bladon Springs, Alabama to Gulf Shores. My wife, Emily, and I had landed a park hosting job almost by accident, and we were excited. We had just spent our first full month in our RV. Bladon Springs, though a nice place for us to stay, had been too secluded. Too lonely. And at times, too eerie.
    The winter was getting colder, but we thought going further south would change all that.
    It didn’t.

  • Something stinks

    Given the chance, our dog, Winnie, will chase any critter. She usually goes after birds because they are the most plentiful, even though they are the hardest to catch. Rabbits taunt her every now and then, and she’s even gotten within inches of one or two. We don’t like it when she chases cats, but they are usually aware of her a solid 50 feet before Winnie is aware of them.

  • Workforce Development Board continues commitment to attracting veteran talent

    By Mo Miller
    Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board

    There is no doubt that our region has a strong connection to and appreciation for our nation’s military. The men and women who serve our country are part of the fabric of our community due in large part to our proximity to Fort Knox. That’s why in 2012, when veterans faced above average unemployment, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board set out to determine why and how we and our regional partners could work together with leaders at Fort Knox to change that.   

  • Kentucky has come a long way when it comes to special education

    Before the mid-1970s, special education in our country’s public schools was all but non-existent. Many students were either outright denied the opportunity to attend because of their disability, or they received inferior instruction if they were able to enroll.

  • See something, say something

    Too often we hear of terrorist attacks and deadly incidents that in many cases could have been prevented or somehow lessened. Strange and erratic behavior is sometimes the first clue to a potential danger posed to our community. That is why the Kentucky Office of Homeland Security developed the “Eye on Kentucky” program.

  • A need for healing

    Have you ever had a teenager screaming and cursing in your face, throwing things as he stormed through the house? Breaking cabinets? Kicking in doors? Have you ever had to watch a teenager scream and curse at your spouse and you weren’t allowed to do anything about it?
    It’s tough to deal with, let me tell you.

  • Envisioning a local food system

    By Sister Claire McGowan, OP
    Guest columnist

  • Troubling traffic trends on the rise

    About a decade ago, Kentucky started to see a welcome trend as the number of highway fatalities began a steady decline. Totals that regularly exceeded 900 a year before 2007 dropped to 638 in 2013, a figure not seen in the commonwealth since the 1940s.
    Unfortunately, that was as low as it would go. The number of fatalities on our roads last year was almost a fifth higher than the benchmark set just two years earlier, and through the first seven-plus months of this year, it’s eight percent ahead of where it was last August.

  • What the hack?

    There is an unseen enemy attacking Americans today. They hide away in some dingy office in a different country. They are smart. They know exactly what to do and who to target. These enemies are the pirates of our homes, the digital pickpockets who can get your entire fortune if you allow them to dig deep enough. They are scammers.
    I don’t really know a better word for them. Perhaps: sleaze-buckets? Scum-suckers? Other words I’m not allowed to put into print?
    For consistency’s sake, we will stick with scammers.