• It’s our problem

    Have you ever suffered from an addiction?

  • The price of a nickel

    By Hannah Wilson

  • Pause to remember 9/11 First Responders Day

    On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: Sept. 11.
    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news. It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.

  • Educating young constituents on the values of civic participation

    As we transition into September and children are settling into their school year routines, I am excited to participate once again in the America’s Legislators Back to School Program. Hosted by the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL), the program helps legislators educate young constituents in their classrooms on the values of civic participation and the legislative process.

  • Lifting barriers, expanding our workforce

    By Megan Stith

    Employment is the path to economic self-sufficiency, a source of dignity and the key in our fight to end poverty. Yet, at the same time our businesses are creating more and more job opportunities, many in our communities are willing and able to work but face barriers to employment.

  • Our work makes a difference

    At their core, the major American holidays are bound by a common thread: They remind us of who we are and what we stand for, each and every year.
    While the Fourth of July celebrates our founding and freedom, Memorial Day and Veterans Day call on us never to forget the high price paid for those enduring gifts. Thanksgiving gives us a moment among loved ones to appreciate the many good things in our lives, and on Labor Day, which arrives this weekend, we pay tribute to the hard work that made our nation what it is today.

  • When in doubt, use the money stroke

    It was almost the end of December when we traveled from Bladon Springs, Alabama to Gulf Shores. My wife, Emily, and I had landed a park hosting job almost by accident, and we were excited. We had just spent our first full month in our RV. Bladon Springs, though a nice place for us to stay, had been too secluded. Too lonely. And at times, too eerie.
    The winter was getting colder, but we thought going further south would change all that.
    It didn’t.

  • Something stinks

    Given the chance, our dog, Winnie, will chase any critter. She usually goes after birds because they are the most plentiful, even though they are the hardest to catch. Rabbits taunt her every now and then, and she’s even gotten within inches of one or two. We don’t like it when she chases cats, but they are usually aware of her a solid 50 feet before Winnie is aware of them.

  • Workforce Development Board continues commitment to attracting veteran talent

    By Mo Miller
    Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board

    There is no doubt that our region has a strong connection to and appreciation for our nation’s military. The men and women who serve our country are part of the fabric of our community due in large part to our proximity to Fort Knox. That’s why in 2012, when veterans faced above average unemployment, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board set out to determine why and how we and our regional partners could work together with leaders at Fort Knox to change that.   

  • Kentucky has come a long way when it comes to special education

    Before the mid-1970s, special education in our country’s public schools was all but non-existent. Many students were either outright denied the opportunity to attend because of their disability, or they received inferior instruction if they were able to enroll.