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Columns

  • Summer program challenge our best and brightest

    Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.
    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.
    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • 'I believe in the future of agriculture...'

    By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    Late last week I was scrolling through Facebook and noticed a video PETA made about the dairy industry had worked its way into my newsfeed.
    I watched, deciding to see what shenanigans and propaganda they were spewing that day.
    They were on their soapbox, talking about how cruel the dairy industry is. How they keep their cows locked up, constantly pregnant and take their calves away as soon as they’re born.

  • Different spokes for different folks

    Someone stole our bikes. The realization couldn’t have stunned me more than if I had been slapped in the face.
    My wife, Emily, and I were only a few months into our first year of teaching in South Korea. I remember that spring day when we saw the two shining bikes glistening in the sunlight outside a shop next to the bus stop. I could imagine the tiny bells on the handlebars ringing at us, calling out for us to buy them.

  • New state laws take effect

    The halls of the Capitol may be relatively quiet when July arrives, but that doesn’t detract from the month’s importance when it comes to running state government. It marks the start of another fiscal year and, in even-numbered years, is when most new state laws take effect.

  • Keeping my feet on the ground

    If you saw me at the Marion County Fair last week, you probably didn’t see me on any rides. You would have seen me taking pictures of concerts, fireworks or perhaps trying to capture the joyous faces of everyone else having fun on the rides. In any case, my feet were planted firmly on the ground.
    Truth is, I love fairs. I love theme parks. The problem? I have an irrational fear of heights.

  • Don't feed the antibiotic panic

    By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    This weekend, while I was in Lexington visiting a friend, we went to a restaurant that advertised, quite frequently and proudly, that their burgers are antibiotic free.
    While the burger was amazing, it wasn't the lack of antibiotics that made it that way because anywhere you go in the United States, there will be no antibiotics in your meat.
    Let me tell you why.

  • Laying the groundwork for the legislative session

    States have often been called laboratories of democracy, and for good reason: That’s where most cutting-edge ideas to improve government are first tested. The good ones are widely copied while the unworkable ones teach a valuable lesson as well.

  • More employers using social media to recruit talent

    By Jennifer Carman

    Much has been written about how job seekers should present themselves on social media. But how can employers seeking talent in the Lincoln Trail region capitalize on social media to draw in the best and brightest?
    An effective talent search leverages many channels, and social media can help companies not only promote career opportunities but also develop its reputation as an employer and engage potential applicants.

  • Find something to be glad about

    Excuse me, but I’m about to channel my inner “Pollyanna.”
    For those of you who aren’t familiar with Pollyanna, let me explain.
    In the best-selling novel, Pollyanna, a young orphan, has been taught by her father how to play "the glad game," in which the goal is to "find something about everything to be glad about.”
    I’ve been trying to do this more often in my own life.
    Sometimes it’s difficult, or darn near impossible, but I still try.

  • Next time, take a cab

    I thought I was being smart when I slipped my wallet into my front pocket. I remember the smirk on my face when my wife, Emily, told me I should put it in the suitcase because it was all the money we had for this trip.
    “I’ll be fine,” I told her, patting the front of my jeans. A pickpocket would never go for the front one. It would be too easy for me to catch them.