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Columns

  • Fed up

    I received an e-mail last month from one of my constituents expressing her frustration about abuses of government low-income assistance programs. She said she was fed up, and I can sympathize.
    She detailed misuses she had witnessed of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) funds. I am sure many of you reading this have witnessed or heard of people who wrongly use or take advantage of such programs.

  • Education in Kentucky is headed in the right direction

    In the late 1990s, when the General Assembly overhauled Kentucky’s public colleges and universities, one of the reform’s central planks was to improve the level of research.
    To spur that along, the state created “Bucks for Brains” and called on the schools to match that money with private donations, an initiative that has since raised more than $800 million.

  • Kinks in the pipeline

    The Bluegrass Pipeline remains a work in progress.
    Governor Steve Beshear doesn't see it as a pressing issue, but at least one group of legislators is trying to learn about the project and its potential impact.
    Executives from the Williams and Boardwalk Pipeline Partners testified Sept. 5 before the Interim Joint Committee on Natural Resources and the Environment. The hearings were broadcast live on KET, and the video of the hearing remains available online (http://www.ket.org/legislature/archives.php).

  • Legislators in the classrooms
  • Our population is changing and growing older

    In the broadest sense, the population changes Kentucky has seen over the last 50 years have largely fallen in line with the country as a whole.
    We have both become increasingly urban, for example, with Kentucky’s tipping point coming in 1970, when the U.S. Census found for the first time that more than half of our citizens lived in or near a city. Both of us are also witnessing the same graying trend, which is no surprise because of advances in medicine and the growing number of Baby Boomers reaching retirement age.

  • I share Bluegrass Pipeline concerns

    Since the Williams Company and Boardwalk Pipeline announced plans earlier this year to run a portion of a 1,100-mile natural gas liquid (NGL) pipeline through Kentucky and through our community here, I’ve heard many concerns by landowners and community members. Concerns that I share.
    The legislature has been closely following the situation and last week convened a meeting of the Interim Joint Committee on Natural Resources and Energy focused on the issue. I am confident this is just the beginning of many conversations we will have in Frankfort about the pipeline.

  • Get out and enjoy what Kentucky has to offer

    With Labor Day behind us and a “biting cold and snowy” winter to come – if the Farmers’ Almanac prediction proves correct – the clock is ticking for those of us who would like to see some of what Kentucky has to offer during the fall.

  • Pipe Dreams

    By Rick Arendt
    Guest Columnist

    I have attended three local informational meetings regarding the proposed pipeline project through our beautiful state and one in Elizabethtown, which was put on by the pipeline companies. I asked questions of the experts supplied and based on their answers I have concluded that absolutely no good can possibly come to the people of Kentucky by allowing this project to begin. It is a very bad idea for our environment, for our safety and for our land values.

  • Backdoor deals

    “Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel.” - Mark Twain
     
    “Sometimes the truth hurts. And sometimes it feels real good.” - Henry Rollins
     
    These two quotes resonate with me after last week’s school board meeting, and I’ll tell you why.

  • Crime rate decreases, respect for law enforcement should increase

    Every year since the late 1980s, the Kentucky State Police has published a highly detailed break-down of the previous year’s crimes, giving us a much closer look at – and appreciation of – the work done every day by our law enforcement officers.
    This information from local and state departments alike is also crucial for those who oversee the state’s criminal justice system, because it points out trends that might otherwise go unnoticed and helps us determine the effectiveness of programs designed to make Kentucky safer.