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Columns

  • Legislature is working to improve the lives of children

    Every legislative session, the General Assembly looks for ways it can improve the lives of our children, both in the classroom and when it comes to their safety.
    This year, the House and Senate passed several new laws that further both of these goals.
    One of the more widely publicized will establish a permanent, independent panel to review those cases in which a child either died or was severely injured as a result of abuse or neglect.

  • Sen. Paul on his filibuster

    By Rand Paul

    U.S. Senator

    If I had planned to speak for 13 hours when I took the Senate floor to start my filibuster, I would’ve worn more comfortable shoes. I started the filibuster with the words, “I rise today to begin to filibuster John Brennan’s nomination for the CIA. I will speak until I can no longer speak” — and I meant it.

  • Big finish to a good session

    The 30-day session of the General Assembly concluded at midnight March 26, after two long days of hard work and bipartisan collaboration to ensure the state’s most pressing issues were addressed. 

  • Kentucky farmers could benefit from hemp bill

    It took nearly a year of study, months of debate and several long nights to finalize, but the General Assembly achieved its biggest goal this legislative session when it enacted far-reaching reforms of Kentucky’s public retirement systems early last week.

  • City will no longer work on private property

    On March 11, Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw issued a memo stating that city employees should no longer do any work on private property, acknowledging that city employees have assisted homeowners and business owners with minor matters in the past.
    “While these acts may have been performed with good intentions, they must not continue,” Crenshaw wrote.
    He added that going forward, the city would follow the letter of the law.

  • News laws result from General Assembly

    Each legislative session is invariably remembered for one or two high-profile laws, but there are always many others that, while not getting as much attention, are important as well.

  • Marion County is making a difference

    “Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.”

  • Taking pause to honor public servant Mike Haydon

    The General Assembly is now recessed for a 10-day veto period and will return on March 25 for the final two days of the 2013 Session. While consensus hasn’t been reached on important bills dealing with the public employee pension reform, industrial hemp and military overseas absentee voting, the Senate is ready and willing to work on these unresolved issues.

  • Increasing transparency is the goal

    Although several major issues are still pending, the General Assembly wrapped up much of its work early this past week, and for a “short” legislative session, there is a fairly long list of key bills that have made it to Governor Beshear’s desk.

  • Bill aimed at improving education

    The 2013 General Assembly Session is nearing its end with the Senate still working hard to ensure important bills and resolutions are being considered and passed. Last week, the Senate addressed issues related to education, victim protection, and drugs, among others.