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Columns

  • Taking a leap of faith

    By Matt Overing
    Summer intern

    I have always looked up to my brother, but don’t tell him that.
    Four years ago, he was getting hitched. He, at 21, had a full-time job, a fiancé and a dog. He knew what he wanted to do with his life.
    I graduated from Boyle County High School in 2010, and had no idea what I wanted to be or do with myself. I chose the University of Kentucky and selected political science as my major. It felt like an easy option, but I was lost. I didn’t know what I wanted.

  • The real meaning behind Memorial Day

    Memorial Day may be the unofficial kick-off to summer, but as we ready for the upcoming holiday weekend, it is vital that we never forget it is much more than that. It is also a time when we as a nation pause to mourn and to reflect upon those men and women who paid the ultimate price defending our freedom.
    The holiday is nearing its 150th anniversary, and given that it came about in the wake of the Civil War, it seems appropriate that there is still some debate between the North and South about its exact origin.

  • Ethics commission finds state rep guilty of harassment

    You may have heard recent news regarding the Legislative Ethics Commission rehearing the case against former State Representative John Arnold due to harassment of two LRC employees. The commission met Wednesday, May 7. Initially, the commission was unable to produce five votes to rule against Arnold, but this week, they voted to rehear the case. At the conclusion of a long day of testimony, the commission found Representative Arnold guilty of the allegations, and he was fined $1,000 for each complaint.

  • Finding ways to improve transportation system a top priority

    When it comes to getting from points A to B, few states can match Kentucky. That’s not too surprising, given that we’re home to the country’s population center east of the Rockies, but the numbers behind our transportation systems are impressive nonetheless.

  • Every day is Mother’s Day

    I love my mom, but I have come to the realization that we don’t have much in common.
    My mom loves to cook. I do not.
    My twin sister enjoys cooking, and she’s good at it. So at least one of us will carry on that trait. I wish I loved to cook, I just don’t. (But, I love to eat. And I always thank the cook.)
    My mom loves to garden. I don’t.

  • The Amazing Randi: An Honest Liar

    I had intended to write a column this week about politicians, but instead I’ve decided to write about a professional liar, James Randi.
    Fittingly, a documentary about Randi called “An Honest Liar” is scheduled to be released soon. For years, Randi worked professionally as a magician, although he prefers “conjurer”, under the name The Amazing Randi.

  • ‘See Something, Say Something’

    We are over two weeks past the session, and there continues to be speculation about the Governor possibly calling an extraordinary session to act on more legislation, specifically Senate Bill 5. I am opposed to an extraordinary session. We had plenty of time to get the work done during the regular session, and bringing the legislators back to Frankfort would cost the tax payers $60,000 each day. There will be another chance to revisit lingering issues next January.

  • Real world look for college students

    It will take some time to gather the information, but one of this year’s new laws has the potential to play a significant role when it comes to helping college students decide which career to pursue.
    The legislation calls on the state’s Center for Education and Workforce Statistics to compile the employment rates and earnings of those graduating from the state’s public postsecondary schools. That agency, which was created just two years ago, will coordinate with the state’s Department of Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE).

  • Those who pay debt to society can regain voting rights

    One issue left unresolved at the end of the General Assembly’s 2014 session focused on whether certain felons should have their voting rights automatically restored once they’ve paid their debt to society.
    It’s likely that lawmakers will revisit the issue in a future legislative session. In the meantime, I hope to clear up one misunderstanding that seemed common in this year’s discussions of the issue.

  • Legislature approves adult-abuse registry

    At the start of each legislative session, it is impossible to know which proposals will clear the hurdles it takes for a bill to become law.
    Some are never heard in committee; others may make it through the House or Senate but get lost in the shuffle on the other side. Some may falter because of cost or a lack of time or public support.