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Columns

  • Stories worth telling

    On Sunday, hundreds of people gathered at Lebanon National Cemetery to honor the military veterans who have served our country in times of war and times of peace. As usual, the crowd was filled with many of those veterans and their families.
    I couldn't help but wonder what those veterans' families know about their service.
    My grandfather on my father's side, Sylvester Lega, was a World War II veteran. He died a few months before I was born, but I know from conversations with my grandmother that he said very little about his time in the service.

  • With pride in their hearts

    Veterans Day is Sunday. It's often a time we think about individuals who have or are serving overseas, whether as part of an active military operation or at one of the United States military bases throughout the world.
    But serving one's country doesn't always mean leaving its borders.
    In the latter half of 1961, the construction of the Berlin Wall started as tensions mounted between the West and the Soviet Union. What became known as the Berlin Crisis prompted several soldiers to be called up for duty.

  • Still more on misleading ads

    If you get mail with "Paid for by Kentucky Family Values" on it, just throw it away.
    Terry Mills wants the ads to stop, too. He wrote in a statement to the Enterprise that he does not support the ads. He has contacted Kentucky Democratic Party leaders to say he does not want the negative ads. They told him they could not stop them.

  • Abandoned animals

    This month marks 30 years since the Marion County Animal Shelter was first opened.

    It's a place I remember well.

  • It isn't about the party, it's about values

    By Jodi George

    Guest columnist

    In 1992, only 51 Marion County residents voted in the Republican primary.  

    Today, the Marion County GOP's membership exceeds 2,000 registered voters.  

    A group that once could squeeze into a phone booth now needs a real meeting room to gather.

  • Still more on misleading ads

    If you get mail with "Paid for by Kentucky Family Values" on it, just throw it away.

    Terry Mills wants the ads to stop, too. He wrote in a statement to the Enterprise that he does not support the ads. He has contacted Kentucky Democratic Party leaders to say he does not want the negative ads. They told him they could not stop them.

  • LMS and SCMS partners for Central Kentucky Youth Showcase

    By Kandice Lanham

    Marion County's middle schools will celebrate Arts & Humanities Day during the New Harmonies Smithsonian exhibit from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Oct. 29, at Centre Square. The showcase will feature visual arts, dance and a combined band and chorus performance by Lebanon and St. Charles middle schools. The theme will be Kentucky folklore, using different genres of music. A final performance will be at 6 p.m.

  • Pathetic Political Ploy

    A group called Kentucky Family Values started running radio ads last week criticizing Bill Pickerill, the Republican candidate for state representative.
    KFV claims that, as a city councilman, Pickerill approved a "300 percent" pay raise for himself, but denied pay increases for local police officers. As a result, officers left Lebanon for other communities and made the city unsafe.
    "It's not even a half-truth," Pickerill said in a phone interview.

  • Mularky and other 'stuff'

    I wasn't sure what to expect when I applied for a press credential to cover the Oct. 11 Vice Presidential Debate, but I also knew this was an opportunity I might never have again. I went to Danville Thursday knowing only that, no, I would not be sitting in the auditorium, and that Centre College was hosting a festival to coincide with "The Thrill in the 'Ville II."

  • The newspaper still matters

    This past July marked my 10th year with The Lebanon Enterprise.

    And in those 10 years, things have changed drastically with this newspaper.

    Actually, the word "drastically" doesn't even begin to describe the number of changes we have experienced here at the Enterprise.

    Our heads are still spinning, to be honest.

    But, there is one thing that hasn't changed.

    Newspapers still matter.