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Columns

  • Do veterans deserve a discount?

    A question arose recently concerning businesses offering discounts to veterans. Should businesses offer, or better yet, should business owners feel obligated to offer a vet a discount on goods and services?
    Let me say that I hold the highest respect for the men and women who served and are now serving in  the armed forces of the United States.
    I especially appreciate the service of Vietnam vets who weren't treated with the utmost respect either during the war or after it ended with the fall of Saigon on April 30, 1975.

  • Scrutiny is not dying

    I have to acknowledge a random stranger for some motivation and inspiration.
    Last Tuesday I was in Frankfort, and while I waited for Mike Haydon's memorial service to begin, a man behind me was engaged in a conversation that piqued my interest.
    The word "scrutiny" is what drew me in.
    The man, who I didn't know, was telling those around him that now was a good time to do something because there was less scrutiny than in the past because newspapers were going broke.
    Now, let me put a few things out there before I dissect what I heard.

  • Evolving education

    A group of Kentucky legislators are questioning proposed education standards for Kentucky students. Apparently, in order to meet national education standards, students should be taught about evolution.
    For a few legislators, this is too much, or it's maybe not enough.
    "I would hope that creationism is presented as a theory in the classroom, in a science classroom, alongside evolution," Sen. David Givens, R-Greensburg, told the Lexington Herald-Leader last week.

  • State cracking down on pain pill abuse

    Kentucky is facing a prescription drug abuse epidemic. You've likely already heard the statistics. Approximately one thousand Kentuckians die each year - that's about three a day - from pain pill overdose. Some reports estimate that one in three Kentuckians has a friend or family member who they say is struggling with prescription drug addiction.

  • Always...Patsy Cline is

    By Ken Begley

     

    Unbelievable.

    The other day Mrs. Ann Faye Sallee, my daughter Jenny's unofficial godmother, stopped by the Springfield State Bank's branch out there on Bardstown Road to see Cindy. She told Cindy that we ought to go see "Always Patsy Cline" playing down at the Opera House. Ann Faye is a devoted follower of the Central Kentucky Community Theatre and said this play is the absolute best they have ever done.

  • Future shock arrives too early

    Many moons ago, I took a sociology class as a student at Western Kentucky University. I don't remember a lot from that class, but I do remember a discussion on culture shock and future shock.

    Culture shock occurs when someone finds themselves in a different culture, and the differences between what a person knows and understands and the new culture becomes disorienting to that person.

  • Facebook status updates from Manton, USA

    If you asked my wife if I were addicted to my cell phone, she would shout, "YES" before the question ventured past your teeth.
    With that comes an incessant need to check social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
    A lot of times I like to try to craft witty Facebook status updates. I didn't say I was witty, I just said I like to try.
    So the other day when I pulled up to the Manton Music Jam, the cobwebs in the part of my brain in charge of Facebook status updates slowly broke loose. I'm pretty sure there was a poof of dust.

  • Finding a cure for cancer

    We all have a story. Now we can all be part of changing that story.
    Taylor Regional Hospital is doing something very exciting. They are participating in an American Cancer Society study to help pinpoint what causes cancer.
    Can you imagine a world without cancer? I hope I live to see that day.
    I still remember how I felt when I heard my grandfather, and then later my grandmother, had cancer. I had a feeling that their lifespan would be cut short by the terrible disease.

  • Finding a cure for cancer

     

    We all have a story. Now we can all be part of changing that story.

    Taylor Regional Hospital is doing something very exciting. They are participating in an American Cancer Society study to help pinpoint what causes cancer.

    Can you imagine a world without cancer? I hope I live to see that day.

  • Drought underscores need for long-term conservation planning

    Submitted by the National Association of Conservation Districts

    This summer, Kentucky has been hit hard by a severe drought, with serious impacts on crop production across the state. The latest precipitation summary shows the region of Marion County having a 7.29-inch rainfall deficit.