• Reading garden will serve the community

    By Jama Watts

    Guest columnist


    If you’ve been in the Marion County Public Library recently, then you’re well aware of how busy we can be.  (And if you haven’t been in, why not? We’re the place to be!) Not only does MCPL serve our county’s population of 20,000, but MCPL also has patrons from the seven counties on our borders.

  • TRACK partners employers, educators to prepare students for careers

    By Mary Taylor

    Guest columnist


    It’s no secret that many businesses in Kentucky and across the country face challenges in finding the skilled employees they need, and employers, educators and others agree that part of the solution is the development of career pathways for secondary students.
    Tech Ready Apprentices for Careers in Kentucky, or TRACK, is a statewide program helping local industries and school districts in the Lincoln Trail region do just that.

  • Building something better

    At the corner of Lincoln and Edmonds Avenues, a home is under construction. Structurally, it’s going to be a house. But when it’s complete, Daphne Staples and her two children will be moving into their new home.
    Staples is this year’s partner with the My New Kentucky Home chapter of Habitat for Humanity. The Build Blitz held July 18-19 ended with the interior wall frames and the exterior walls being raised and the roof being affixed to the structure.

  • A clarification

    By Carrie Bridgman

    I'm glad to have started a conversation with my column on marriage equality, as it is a conversation that needs to happen. Given the number of recent editorials discussing my column, I want to clarify several points. Anyone who would like to speak with me further about this issue is welcome to contact me privately.

  • What Would Jesus Do and SCOTUS decision

    By Jonathan Bennett
    Guest columnist

  • It’s more than just community theatre

    By G.B. Dixon

    The lights are dark once more on the stage of Angelic Hall in Centre Square. "The Sound of Music" has concluded. Gone altogether are the crowds which lent personality to each chair for two weekends. Home are the stagehands, the technicians, costumers, ushers, musicians, and actors that dedicated themselves to summoning the excellence of Broadway to the Bluegrass. Weary are the producer and director.

  • A variety of discussions and debates continue

    The recent United States Supreme Court ruling on Obergefell vs. Hodges has overturned bans against same-sex marriage for all states in the U.S. This, of course, includes Kentucky, and there have been questions raised by county clerks, religious leaders, legislators, and citizens. An issue such as this is personal for many, and it is not a surprise that the transition has been complicated. As your senator, it is my job to look at how the ruling affects Kentucky statutes and our constitution. We will have work to do on this issue in the next general assembly.

  • Heroin law should go a long way in reducing drug overdoses

    Earlier this year, when the General Assembly approved legislation designed to curb the state’s heroin epidemic, many called the law a national model because of the way it blended additional treatment, smart-on-crime measures and tougher penalties for traffickers.
    On Monday, July 20, we learned that another comprehensive law in this field, this one targeting prescription drug abuse, is making the significant difference that other legislators and I had hoped when we passed it in 2012.

  • Helping the library

    By Molly McMasters
    Guest columnist

    The Friends of the Library (FOL) is a non-profit organization that exists only to support our local Marion County Public Library. Our group meets every other month (odd numbered months) on the second Thursday of the month at 5:15 p.m. in the small meeting room of the library.

  • State benefits from summer school programs

    Next month, Morehead State University will open what will be the state’s second specialty high school geared toward our best and brightest students.
    The Craft Academy for Excellence in Science and Mathematics will ultimately be home to 120 high school juniors and seniors from across the state, all of whom will have a chance to earn up to 60 college credit hours over a two-year period.