.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Petition committee responds

    Editor’s note: The following guest column was written in response to an editorial published in the April 20 edition of The Lebanon Enterprise entitled, “Don’t sign the petition.” The following is being published exactly how it was submitted to the Enterprise. It should be noted that their claims about two board members’ having “concerns” are unsubstantiated.

  • Internships: Growth opportunity for students, mentors

    By Dr. Thelma White

    A recent study by the Chronicle of Education found that many employers value work experience, particularly internships and employment during school, in addition to grade-point average and college major.
    While it’s still important for students to pursue a strong academic foundation and have a focused career path, we have increasingly encouraged our students to supplement their education with real work experience. 

  • Governor’s vetoes are a disappointment

    Other than constitutional amendments, which go before the voters, every bill the General Assembly passes has to clear one final hurdle before becoming law: The governor’s pen.
    The governor has the authority to sign or reject bills, or to let them become law without a signature. He or she can only approve or veto bills in their entirety – except in budgetary matters, which can be line-item vetoed without affecting the rest.

  • The heart of education
  • Workforce program helps employers offset training costs

    By Jim Skees

    Across the country, a lack of skilled workers is challenging employers both large and small in a number of industries. 
    We face the same workforce concerns in Kentucky and the Lincoln Trail region. That’s one reason why the Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail and the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board work vigorously to support job seekers and connect them with area employers.

  • New legislation that you need to know about

    Legislative sessions tend to be remembered for just a handful of new laws, and this year’s, which ended April 15, is no different.
    The budget was understandably the most prominent, with its chief highlight being the significant amount of new money the General Assembly put toward the unfunded liabilities of our public retirement systems.

  • Nephew receives new lungs, new life

    By Harry VanWhy
    Guest columnist

    It was June 9, 2011. This was the night that my 20-year-old nephew would receive his new lungs. I was there at the Tampa Hospital to be beside my brother, Dave, while he waited for his son, Davey, to receive his life-saving new lungs.

  • Censorship infringes on our freedom

    By Brittany S. Greenwell
    Guest columnist

  • State budget passes, important bills signed into law
  • State budget doesn’t fix public retirement systems but it puts us on the right course

    For more than a decade now, the most pressing long-term problem in Kentucky has been the growing liabilities of our public retirement systems for teachers and state employees.
    Both systems had far more than they needed a dozen or so years ago, but two recessions since then have swept most of those gains away.
    While the systems are able to pay monthly benefits, they are still having to sell assets, making it tougher for their other investments to compensate. This trend could be catastrophic in a decade or two if we don’t act now.