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Columns

  • ‘See Something, Say Something’

    We are over two weeks past the session, and there continues to be speculation about the Governor possibly calling an extraordinary session to act on more legislation, specifically Senate Bill 5. I am opposed to an extraordinary session. We had plenty of time to get the work done during the regular session, and bringing the legislators back to Frankfort would cost the tax payers $60,000 each day. There will be another chance to revisit lingering issues next January.

  • Real world look for college students

    It will take some time to gather the information, but one of this year’s new laws has the potential to play a significant role when it comes to helping college students decide which career to pursue.
    The legislation calls on the state’s Center for Education and Workforce Statistics to compile the employment rates and earnings of those graduating from the state’s public postsecondary schools. That agency, which was created just two years ago, will coordinate with the state’s Department of Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE).

  • Kentucky Baroque Trumpeters – Not just another band

    By Ruth Ann Fogle

    In June of this year I had the opportunity to attend a concert at Saint Augustine Catholic Church where I shared an experience I would have never dreamed possible in Lebanon.

  • Manufacturing Day recognizes sector’s career opportunities, economic impact

    By Mo Miller

    There is no doubt manufacturing is one of our most critical industry sectors. Last year, manufacturing supported one in six private-sector jobs in America, and it is our state’s top economic driver, representing 17 percent of Kentucky’s GDP. 

  • Breastfeeding: A winning goal for life

    Josey Crew RD, LD, CLC
    Lincoln Trail District Health Department

  • Those who pay debt to society can regain voting rights

    One issue left unresolved at the end of the General Assembly’s 2014 session focused on whether certain felons should have their voting rights automatically restored once they’ve paid their debt to society.
    It’s likely that lawmakers will revisit the issue in a future legislative session. In the meantime, I hope to clear up one misunderstanding that seemed common in this year’s discussions of the issue.

  • Legislature approves adult-abuse registry

    At the start of each legislative session, it is impossible to know which proposals will clear the hurdles it takes for a bill to become law.
    Some are never heard in committee; others may make it through the House or Senate but get lost in the shuffle on the other side. Some may falter because of cost or a lack of time or public support.

  • Successful session is complete

    Sine die came on April 15 at midnight. In case you don't know what “sine die” means (I did not until I ran for the House of Rep) it is Latin for “the end.” This 60-day session was a very busy one with more than 800 pieces of legislation filed, and just over 100 passed into law. The most important bills of this session were the budget bills.

  • Kentucky proud

    Fans of the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have had a lot to celebrate in recent years.
    Kentucky won its eighth NCAA men’s basketball title two years ago, and this year's team reached the tournament finals. In the last few years, Louisville reached a Final Four and won its third championship in basketball, sent a baseball team to the College World Series, won the Sugar Bowl in football and sent its women's basketball team to its second championship game appearance.
    But really, that stuff is meaningless.

  • General Assembly’s work is through, for now

    When the General Assembly left the Capitol late last month for its traditional veto recess – the roughly two-week period a governor has to approve or reject legislation – it was already becoming clear that the regular session’s final two days would be busy.