• Tourism industry is crucial for state’s economy and way of life

    Next year, Kentucky’s tourism industry will mark a major milestone when Mammoth Cave celebrates the 200th anniversary of its first commercial tour.
    The world’s longest cave is our country’s second-oldest paid attraction, trailing only Niagara Falls, and it and the surrounding national park have since become a major destination. It draws more than two million visitors a year above ground, and about a fourth of those tour the sights below.

  • Place matters in economic success

    By Edna Berger

    When I moved to Elizabethtown in the 1970s, I immediately felt connected to this community. I saw right away that this was a place with so much to offer, all driven by people who truly cared.
    I still recall when my child’s principal knew who I was and where I worked even though we had never met. I was blown away, but that’s just the sort of thing that turns a city into a quality community.

  • There’s always room for improvement

    When it comes to grading Kentucky’s public elementary and secondary schools, what ultimately counts most is whether our graduating students are truly ready for college and a career.
    Over the last several years, one of the state’s newest agencies – the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics – has been helping measure our progress in this area. Its work is more than just a survey; it’s an in-depth look at an entire graduating class.

  • Love and protect the skin you’re in

    By Elaine Helm

  • Let your voice be heard on proposed pipeline project

    Last week, it was announced that the Federal Environmental Regulatory Commission (FERC) will study a proposed conversion of a natural gas pipeline that crosses Kentucky. As you know, this gas line, most of which is underground, was completed in 1944 as a part of a wartime effort to supply natural gas to the Northeast.

  • Giving citizens a second chance

    When the General Assembly passes a new law cracking down on criminal behavior, there is an informal question legislators must first address: Is this someone we’re mad at, or someone we’re afraid of?
    It’s an important distinction. Those we’re afraid of, so to speak, need to be removed from society for a long time, but those we’re mad at need a path forward that helps them re-integrate into private life when their punishment is finished.

  • ‘At his best’

    My dad taught me how to do many things during his life.
    He taught me how to pick out the perfect walking stick during our hikes together, and that trail mix (with M&Ms) is a necessity during long walks.
    He taught me the significance and importance of good photography. The photos he took of my twin sister and me when we were younger are priceless in my eyes.
    And, while I didn’t realize it at the time, he taught me that running can be a way to escape the stresses of life, as well as stay in shape.

  • Mid-Kentucky Chorus to perform Broadway classics

    By G.B. Dixon

    With one simple phrase set to music, George M. Cohan gave identity, community, and mystique to one small area along a common roadway cutting through New York City. That was in 1904, and today people are still singing, dancing, and humming Mr. Cohan's songful commemoration to the world of stage: "Give My Regards to Broadway."

  • State’s employment rate and revenues are up

    Recently, encouraging economic news was reported regarding Kentucky’s revenues and unemployment status. According to the state budget office’s report this month, Kentucky’s revenues increased 4.8 percent as compared to March of 2014. In fact, for fiscal year 2015, which runs from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015, receipts are up 4.1 percent and expected to stay that way throughout the final months.  

  • ‘All Shook Up’ on stage in Springfield this weekend

    By G.B. Dixon

    It will not be religious fervor that makes folks shake, rattle and roll this weekend in Springfield, just a love for the sights and sounds of the 1950s and a ticket to the musical "All Shook Up," presented by the Central Kentucky Community Theatre Youth Actors.