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Columns

  • Kentucky’s scorecard is eye opening

    No matter the subject, it seems we always want to know how we compare with others. 

    It happens on the playing field, in the boardroom and in the classroom. It also takes place among the states as they try to gain any kind of competitive edge.

  • A sense of community

    By Kaelin G. Reed

  • Keep our children safe

    As we move into fall and our schedules become full with our kids’ homework and after-school activities, it’s always a good time to focus on their safety, too.  Much like the calls and e-mails I receive from constituents in need of the Veteran’s Crisis Hotline, I also receive a number of calls and e-mails from constituents looking for information on the Amber Alert program, as well as the best way to get information on sexual predators in the community.

  • End of an era

    The last group of inmates have left Marion Adjustment Center.
    The Kentucky Department of Corrections data shows that on Sept. 16, 14 inmates were being housed at the private prison in St. Mary.
    As of Sept. 17, MAC was no longer listed in the state’s daily count reports (available here: http://goo.gl/gHhMz).
    I apologize for not reporting this sooner. I had the information for last week’s paper, but among the various stories we juggle, I forgot to actually type it.

  • We aren't invincible

    We're all guilty of it.
    We ignore warning labels.
    We drive short distances without our seatbelts.
    We take the batteries out of our smoke alarms because it just won't stop beeping in the middle of the night.
    We shake our heads at a car full of teenagers driving too fast and say, "They think they're invincible."
    But don't we all? Until tragedy strikes us, we all walk around feeling a little bit invincible.
    I did, too. Until Aug. 9 when flames engulfed my home.

  • Fed up

    I received an e-mail last month from one of my constituents expressing her frustration about abuses of government low-income assistance programs. She said she was fed up, and I can sympathize.
    She detailed misuses she had witnessed of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) funds. I am sure many of you reading this have witnessed or heard of people who wrongly use or take advantage of such programs.

  • Education in Kentucky is headed in the right direction

    In the late 1990s, when the General Assembly overhauled Kentucky’s public colleges and universities, one of the reform’s central planks was to improve the level of research.
    To spur that along, the state created “Bucks for Brains” and called on the schools to match that money with private donations, an initiative that has since raised more than $800 million.

  • Kinks in the pipeline

    The Bluegrass Pipeline remains a work in progress.
    Governor Steve Beshear doesn't see it as a pressing issue, but at least one group of legislators is trying to learn about the project and its potential impact.
    Executives from the Williams and Boardwalk Pipeline Partners testified Sept. 5 before the Interim Joint Committee on Natural Resources and the Environment. The hearings were broadcast live on KET, and the video of the hearing remains available online (http://www.ket.org/legislature/archives.php).

  • Legislators in the classrooms
  • Our population is changing and growing older

    In the broadest sense, the population changes Kentucky has seen over the last 50 years have largely fallen in line with the country as a whole.
    We have both become increasingly urban, for example, with Kentucky’s tipping point coming in 1970, when the U.S. Census found for the first time that more than half of our citizens lived in or near a city. Both of us are also witnessing the same graying trend, which is no surprise because of advances in medicine and the growing number of Baby Boomers reaching retirement age.