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Editorials

  • Tell FERC what you think

    Editor’s note: This editorial was published recently in The Advocate-Messenger in Danville. It’s being reprinted with permission through the Kentucky Press News Service.

  • Times are changing

    Change is inevitable.
    Change can be difficult.
    Change can also be a very good thing.
    But, there is a certain comfort in keeping things the same. It’s a paradox, really. Many are resistant to change, but change is the only way we can grow, the only way we can advance.
    And there is one inevitable truth: change happens whether we want it to or not.
    Take Marion County Public Schools, for instance.

  • Grand ham slam

    “It’s essential to keep an open mind, and to be willing – better yet, eager – to try new things.” - Michael Abrash

    Trying new things can be challenging, and darn near impossible for some people who dislike change. But, often times, it’s very much worth it.
    Such is the case with this year’s Marion County Country Ham Days Festival.

  • Commisson must follow open meetings law

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission are supposed to be the fun people in government. Lately, that hasn’t been the case.
    Two of the last three meetings were plagued by closed sessions, talks of discipline or removal of Executive Director Nena Olivier, and personnel decisions were discussed when the public had the right to know what was going on.

  • Give the gift of life

    Imagine waking up this morning and finding out that you need a life-saving organ to survive.
    You, a family member or a friend might be living that reality today.
    Or, you might find out tomorrow that you need a new kidney.
    Or, a week from now your doctor could tell you that your child needs a new heart, your mother needs new lungs or your father needs a new liver to survive.
    Can you imagine?
    More than 1,000 adults and children in Kentucky are living that reality right now. They are waiting for a life-saving transplant this very second.

  • Don’t sign the petition

    It's time to call a spade a spade.
    In last week’s edition, we published a story about a committee that has formed to petition to recall the nickel tax.
    Four of the five Marion Countians on the committee also petitioned to put the nickel tax to a vote in 2007. Randall Lawson, Richie Lee, Robby Shewmaker and Robert Darrell Shewmaker were involved in a similar effort then, and they were successful in their efforts. The nickel tax was put on the ballot in November of 2008, and was recalled. (This time, Joe Livers has joined the committee.)

  • What if it were you?

    Imagine for a moment that you have just been released from jail. You’re carrying a plastic bag with a change of underwear, socks and a toothbrush. Your pockets are empty. Your wallet would be, too, if you owned one. You have no family. The friends you have are still doing drugs. You know if you go to them you will be tempted by your previous addiction. But you’ve changed. You’re trying to better yourself. You don’t want to fall back into those old habits.  

  • Guest editorial: Awash in guns, fear, we’re less safe

    By the Lexington Herald-Leader

    Pro-gun rhetoric plays on our deepest fears.
    “The only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.”
    That presents a simple world of good versus bad, each self-evident, where you hope the good guy has a gun and is the better shot.

  • Kentucky budget deadline obligation of the job

    By The Kentucky New Era Editorial Board

    It’s a rare job that would pay someone to work extra days if they failed to meet a deadline that was agreed upon well in advance. But that’s the deal for members of the Kentucky General Assembly if they don’t reach an agreement soon on the state’s 2016-18 budget. They would come back for a special session called by the governor to finish their work — and do it at the expense of taxpayers.

  • HB40 will offer some a fresh start

    By The Kentucky Standard Editorial Board

    It took many years to test the waters of opening juvenile court proceedings with Kentucky legislators, but, finally, many agree that passing Senate Bill 40 is the first step in the right direction.
    While SB40 doesn’t open all juvenile court proceedings in all Kentucky courtrooms, it is allowing, for the first time, a creation of a small number of pilot sites in Kentucky courts that will open child abuse and neglect proceedings.