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Editorials

  • Give the gift of life

    Imagine waking up this morning and finding out that you need a life-saving organ to survive.
    You, a family member or a friend might be living that reality today.
    Or, you might find out tomorrow that you need a new kidney.
    Or, a week from now your doctor could tell you that your child needs a new heart, your mother needs new lungs or your father needs a new liver to survive.
    Can you imagine?
    More than 1,000 adults and children in Kentucky are living that reality right now. They are waiting for a life-saving transplant this very second.

  • Don’t sign the petition

    It's time to call a spade a spade.
    In last week’s edition, we published a story about a committee that has formed to petition to recall the nickel tax.
    Four of the five Marion Countians on the committee also petitioned to put the nickel tax to a vote in 2007. Randall Lawson, Richie Lee, Robby Shewmaker and Robert Darrell Shewmaker were involved in a similar effort then, and they were successful in their efforts. The nickel tax was put on the ballot in November of 2008, and was recalled. (This time, Joe Livers has joined the committee.)

  • Kentucky budget deadline obligation of the job

    By The Kentucky New Era Editorial Board

    It’s a rare job that would pay someone to work extra days if they failed to meet a deadline that was agreed upon well in advance. But that’s the deal for members of the Kentucky General Assembly if they don’t reach an agreement soon on the state’s 2016-18 budget. They would come back for a special session called by the governor to finish their work — and do it at the expense of taxpayers.

  • HB40 will offer some a fresh start

    By The Kentucky Standard Editorial Board

    It took many years to test the waters of opening juvenile court proceedings with Kentucky legislators, but, finally, many agree that passing Senate Bill 40 is the first step in the right direction.
    While SB40 doesn’t open all juvenile court proceedings in all Kentucky courtrooms, it is allowing, for the first time, a creation of a small number of pilot sites in Kentucky courts that will open child abuse and neglect proceedings.

  • Home-work

    We hoped we wouldn’t have to discuss this again. We hoped two years into Taylora Schlosser’s term as superintendent of Marion County Public Schools that she would have established a residence here, rendering any discussion of that matter a moot point.
    In a way, it is a moot point (at least for the next few years) because a majority of the board of education voted (3-2) last week to remove the residency requirement from Schlosser’s contract.

  • Community bonds

    This week, we take a look back at the flood of 2010. By all accounts, it was the biggest flood anyone still living can remember.
    John Thomas, superintendent of Lebanon Water Works, recalls feelings of dread when he watched water enter the water plant in Calvary. If things had been a little worse, Marion County may not have had water service for weeks.
    In Bradfordsville, homes were overwhelmed by water. Fifteen houses had to be torn down, according to Mayor David Edelen.

  • Snow days pack reasons to be thankful

    Snow.
    So. Much. Snow.
    We’re not complaining (other areas of the country, such as Boston, have had it much worse). But, we’ve had our fill. At least most of us have.
    We would be remiss if we didn’t recognize and show our appreciation for the people in this community who have worked countless hours to make life as normal as possible with 12 to 14 inches of snow.

  • The year to come

    All too often we remember the bad news first, and there was plenty of that in 2014.
    Fatal car wrecks, a drowning, and cancer all took away loved ones from our community during the past year, and a fatal shooting marred the holiday season.
    The community certainly expressed its displeasure with decisions by school officials, although there was good news in education as well. Marion County Public Schools were named a proficient district, and the high school reported record-high ACT scores.

  • Guest editorial: How legislators divert student aid

    The Courier-Journal

    It’s a new year for Kentucky college students, bringing new pressure to pay for the fast-rising costs of higher education in this state.
    The first step is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA, that students attending or planning to attend college must complete in order to get federal and state financial aid for the coming academic year.

  • Guest editorial: Beyond smoke-free

    By Courier-Journal

    It looks as though the General Assembly might actually pass a statewide law to make public places smoke-free in Kentucky in 2015.
    The public supports it. And in a state with the nation's highest rate of smoking, that's significant.
    A January 2014 poll by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky found that 65 percent of the state's adults favor a state law to ban smoking indoors at public places such as government buildings, stores, restaurants and offices.