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Editorials

  • Seeing the forest

    When is the last time you got together with thousands of people to do something?
    We don’t mean when were you in a crowd of thousands of people. Maybe you attended a sporting event, ran in a road race or visited a festival, but you — and the rest of the people — weren’t there to work together.
    Well, more than 3,500 people did get together Sunday at TG Kentucky and they did have the same purpose.
    They planted a forest.

  • Fit as a fiddle

    In spite of cold weather and less-than-ideal road conditions, hundreds of people made it to this year's Kentucky Bluegrass Music Kickoff.
    When the festival started, it was held at the Centre Square Convention Center, but it didn't take long for the event to need more space. Since then, it's been held at Marion County High School.

  • Public servant

    Karen Spalding dedicated her career to serving the public.
    During her senior year  at Marion County High School, Spalding went to work in the Marion County Clerk’s Office more than 39 years ago. In 2006, she was elected to lead that office. Her co-workers and later her employees praised her abilities and her willingness to do whatever she could to assist the public.

  • Our New Year’s wishes

    Today is the first day of 2014. Make it a good one.
    With a new year comes a new start, another chance to get it right.
    We are certain all of us have some regrets from 2013. Things we did. Things we didn’t do. Things we should have done. And while we can’t turn back time, or erase any of those regrets, we have 365 days in front of us to try again. We can push the reset button, so to speak.

  • House GOP strikes blow for inequality; Barr calls food aid cuts 'compassionate'

    From the Lexington Herald Leader

    House Republicans are right to be outraged that 14 percent of American households are on food stamps, but they're outraged for the wrong reason.
    The plight of so many Americans — including the 1 in 5 Kentuckians who depend on food stamps — stems from the worst economic inequality on record.

  • Kentucky shortchanges public education; study shows how funding falls short

    From the Lexington Herald Leader

    Gov. Steve Beshear and many lawmakers have consoled themselves with the soothing fiction that, despite deep cuts in everything from child care to State Police, Kentucky weathered the Great Recession without cutting basic state support for public schools.
    While that might be technically true, the real-life effect of years of flat appropriations, while costs grew, is a decline of almost 10 percent in per-student funding from fiscal 2008 until this year.

  • License hemp but don't oversell; crop no game-changer

    From the Lexington Herald-Leader

    Goodness knows, a state that grows tobacco, which kills people, and champions products like gambling and liquor is hard-pressed to put on airs when it comes to industrial hemp, a botanical cousin to marijuana.
    So we stand by our longstanding support for legalizing industrial hemp production.
    But make no mistake about it, industrial hemp will not transform Kentucky's economy.

  • Slightly off

    It’s been a busy few months for the Marion County Board of Education. Many things have happened in a very short amount of time. So, let’s review…
    Superintendent Chuck Hamilton unexpectedly announced his retirement on May 2, and the search for a new superintendent began immediately.
    On June 25, the board hired Steve Burkich as the acting superintendent of Marion County Public Schools.

  • Open & accountable

    The Gravel Switch Fire Department is going through some big changes.
    Recently, the leadership of the department has changed, with Kevin Rogers taking over as chief and Jamie Garrett taking over as assistant chief. They replace former chief Larry Vaughn and his assistant chief Vincent Tungate.
    The Gravel Switch community has also created a new advisory council to provide oversight and assistance to the fire department.

  • Race the Rainbow

    The streets of Lebanon are stained with different colors from Saturday’s Color in Motion 5K. It’s likely many Kentuckians, including hundreds of Marion Countians, are also sporting some colorful residue on different parts of their bodies after participating in the fun event. Heck, some of our four-legged friends probably have some colorful coats, too, after tagging along during the 3.1-mile route, which included color stations where runners were doused with red, orange, purple, green, blue and yellow powdered paint.