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Editorials

  • High on the Hog

    It's customary for this newspaper to write an editorial the week after Marion County Country Ham Days to praise the Chamber of Commerce and the countless volunteers that make the annual fall festival such a huge success.

    Looking back in our archives, it's interesting to see how the festival has continually grown.

  • High on the Hog

    It's customary for this newspaper to write an editorial the week after Marion County Country Ham Days to praise the Chamber of Commerce and the countless volunteers that make the annual fall festival such a huge success.

    Looking back in our archives, it's interesting to see how the festival has continually grown.

  • Spoil sports

    Rivalry games always inspire emotions, and that makes that game a little more special for players and fans on both sides.
    That's true of the Louisville-Kentucky rivalry. The Marion County-Washington County rivalry is no different.
    But that's not an excuse for vandalism, and unfortunately, that's what happened at both high schools last week. On Friday morning, we learned that the football fields at Marion and Washington counties had been defaced.

  • Always Faithful

    William "Buster" Mattingly is not a man who brags about what he has done, but as we have learned, what he has done is worth talking about.
    Mattingly entered the Marines Corps in 1944, just a few years after President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order requiring the military to allow anyone to serve regardless of race. That order may have opened the doors for African-Americans, but it did not end the attitudes that had kept many of them out of the service.
    Nevertheless, Mattingly enlisted, and he was sent to Camp Lejeune, N.C. - well, almost.

  • Always Faithful

    William "Buster" Mattingly is not a man who brags about what he has done, but as we have learned, what he has done is worth talking about.

    Mattingly entered the Marines Corps in 1944, just a few years after President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order requiring the military to allow anyone to serve regardless of race. That order may have opened the doors for African-Americans, but it did not end the attitudes that had kept many of them out of the service.

  • Rooms to grow

    This past weekend was the most recent example that Lebanon can and does attract visitors.
    Last week, those visitors were the participants in the 2012 Jets Over Kentucky event, which has become the largest remote control jet showcase in the United States and possibly the world.

  • Rooms to grow

    This past weekend was the most recent example that Lebanon can and does attract visitors.

    Last week, those visitors were the participants in the 2012 Jets Over Kentucky event, which has become the largest remote control jet showcase in the United States and possibly the world.

  • Girls who rock

    Mobile, Ala., got another sample of Kentucky pride last week when a Marion County contingent took the city by storm in support of Paige Wilson who competed in the Distinguished Young Woman competition.

    But, the folks in Mobile should be getting used to Kentuckians by now. After all, last year it seemed as if half the state traveled there to root for Marion County's own Christine Mattingly in the 2011 national program.

    Both young women have represented our state and our county well.

  • For the health of it

    Kentucky is proud to be ranked highly when it comes to basketball, but when it comes to obesity, it's not something we like to brag about.

    But, it's a reality, nonetheless.

    Last year, Kentucky was ranked the sixth fattest state in the country, according to a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH). The report states that 31.5 percent of our state's population is obese.

    But, it hasn't always been this way.

  • Racism in Raywick

    There's no denying that the City of Raywick has a reputation.

    Historically, it's experienced some rowdy times.

    And, in the past, it wasn't always the most welcoming city toward African-Americans.

    In fact, there was a time when it would have been shocking to even see an African-American inside Raywick's city limits.

    But, times have changed. People have changed.

    Or, have they?