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Editorials

  • Give what you can

    We spent much of two days last week watching radar, looking for up-to-the-minute weather reports and seeing what could be heading our way. We were spared any major damage, but we have seen how devastating the system was through national and state news reports.

    We also know about the generosity of Marion Countians. We witnessed it firsthand with the ice storm and the flooding that affected our community in recent years.

  • Raise your glasses

    If you support tourism in Lebanon, last week was a reason to celebrate.
    Not only did the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission welcome its new executive director, but the community was able to celebrate what could become our next tourist attraction.
    The tourist commission had a rough year in 2011 for more reasons than we care to list here, but 2012 has gotten off to a much better start.

  • Leading by example

    Marion County has many reasons to be proud right now.
    We have the top girls basketball team in the state, numerous published (and soon-to-be published) authors, top-performing schools and, of course, the Turtleman, who continues to make the headlines and airwaves for his... ahem... talents.
    Saturday evening, Marion County added another accomplishment to our list.

  • Opening the door

    In many ways, the Marion County Industrial Foundation is a mystery. For decades, a collection of local business leaders and public officials have met regularly to help design an economic development strategy for our community.
    Nevertheless, what the foundation does has been unclear to many of us. The foundation provides oversight over the Marion County Economic Development Office, but unlike the Lebanon City Council or the Marion County Fiscal Court, the industrial foundation is not considered a public agency, at least, not in the eyes of the law.

  • Game On

    Makayla Epps closed out 2011 in style. 

    She has already established herself as one of the premier athletes to come through Marion County High School, but she solidified her place in the school's athletic history by becoming the all-time leading scorer.

    Epps reached this milestone during the championship game of the Mercer Titan Christmas Clash on Dec. 30. The Lady Knights junior point guard surpassed Marlis Scott's record of 2,062 career points in the second quarter of the contest.

  • Holly Jolly

    The Cardinal Den was as busy as Santa's workshop Thursday evening, at least for a little while.
    Presents were being wrapped and sorted. Gifts for girls went to one table, gifts for boys to another. Chairs and tables were rearranged in anticipation of the arrival of children and a special guest, Santa Claus.
    The kids showed up first, trickling in one, two, three, four at a time with their parents and grandparents. How many children? We aren't sure. We lost count somewhere around 50.

  • Hard pill to swallow

    Look in your medicine cabinet. Take a peek in your glove compartment. Glance at your kitchen counter.
    You may not realize it, but you could be looking at one of the biggest drug problems facing Marion County and Kentucky.
    When used carefully and correctly, prescription pills can go a long way toward treating a lot of medical issues. Unfortunately, it doesn't take much for a medical treatment to turn into chemical dependency.
    We still have other drugs in our community, but prescription pills have become the biggest concern for local law enforcement.

  • Remember Our Troops

    By Alicia Matthews

     

    Christmas is here, it's that time of year -

    Everyone is rushing, spreading good cheer!

    But far, far away in a land strange to most - 

    Our troops stand watch, at our Bases and Posts.

     

    Our children are excited to sit on Santa's lap -

  • Bill of goods

    State officials are often accused of trying to balance the budget on the backs of county governments.

    HB 463, which was approved earlier this year, may turn out to be the latest example of that.

    When Gov. Steve Beshear signed the bill into law, he touted the legislation as an effort to be tough and smart on crime. The bill was also promoted as a way to save the state $422 million over the next 10 years.

  • In the spotlight

    We can understand why Anthony Epps would be upset.

    We doubt anyone wants to have their name in the paper for being arrested for DUI. The same would be true for whatever punishment is handed down from the courts if that person is found or pleads guilty.